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Representational image of an ancient meeting hall. Source: Sunshower Shots / Adobe Stock.

Colossal 3,000-Year-Old Monument Found in Germany May Be King Hinz Meeting Hall

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In the historically rich soil of Brandenburg, Germany, archaeologists have unearthed a colossal Bronze Age building, thought to be the fabled meeting hall of King Hinz, a legendary figure purported to be interred in a golden coffin. The Brandenburg State Office for Monument Preservation confirmed the finding of the hall near the royal grave at Seddin, raising speculation and excitement about its connection to the enigmatic ruler.

The Hall of Legends

Spiegel reported that the discovery of the hall, measuring an impressive 31 by 10 meters (102 by 33 feet), was announced by the state archaeologist Franz Schopper as a "spectacular find." The excavation, led by Immo Heske from Georg-August University of Göttingen, began in March and reached completion by fall. This structure is a rare architectural gem from the Nordic Bronze Age, dating back nearly 3,000 years, with only two others known in the area spanning from Denmark to southern Germany.

Researchers were captivated by the hall's dimensions, suggesting it served as a palatial residence. The construction techniques speak volumes about the era’s craftsmanship, with walls of wooden planks, wattle, daub, and clay plaster, topped with a thatched roof. Inside, a central fireplace and an unearthed miniature vessel, likely used in rituals, add to the hall’s aura of mystery and historical importance.

Burial Mound Mysteries

Not far from this ancient hall stands the burial mound in Seddin, visible from miles around and discovered by chance in the 19th century. This site is tied to the legend of King Hinz, whose burial in a golden coffin remains part of local folklore. Said to have reigned over Prignitz with a just and benevolent hand, King Hinz is an elusive figure in history with little detail known about his rule.

The burial mound itself is a significant archaeological feature from the 9th century BC, underpinning the region's status in Bronze Age Europe.

The German Research Foundation (DFG) has invested in the site, funding ongoing research to unravel the stories hidden beneath the soil of Prignitz. With a grant of 300,000 euros over three years, the research aims to decode the past of this illustrious and mysterious ruler, as well as the people who lived in his realm.

Entrance to the Royal tomb of Sedding, (Ulf Heinsohn / CC by SA 4.0)

Entrance to the Royal tomb of Sedding, (Ulf Heinsohn / CC by SA 4.0)

A Royal Seat Uncovered

The excavation of this hall sheds light on the grandeur of Bronze Age royalty. The presence of such a monumental structure, along with the royal grave, suggests that the area was once a significant power center. The exact nature of King Hinz’s rule, and the veracity of his existence, remain as enigmatic as the partial stories his supposed hall has to tell.

As archaeological efforts continue, each layer of earth turned over offers potential answers to centuries-old questions about the Bronze Age societies of Northern Central Europe. The grand hall of what could be King Hinz’s domain reveals the sophistication and social structure of the time, prompting a reevaluation of prehistoric Germanic cultures.

View of the excavation area near Seddin in Brandenburg: the ground floor of the building alone had an area of ​​240 square meters Photo: University of Göttingen / Sem. UFG

View of the excavation area near Seddin in Brandenburg: the ground floor of the building alone had an area of ​​240 square meters Photo: University of Göttingen / Sem. UFG

The legend of King Hinz may have found a foothold in history with this find, as the archaeological community eagerly continues to piece together the life and times surrounding this majestic Bronze Age hall.

Top image: Representational image of an ancient meeting hall. Source: Sunshower Shots / Adobe Stock.

By Joanna Gillan

 
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Joanna

Joanna Gillan is a Co-Owner, Editor and Writer of Ancient Origins. 

Joanna completed a Bachelor of Science (Psychology) degree in Australia and published research in the field of Educational Psychology. She has a rich and varied career, ranging from teaching... Read More

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