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A diver exploring the newly-discovered Greek city in the Aegean Sea

Huge Ancient Greek City found underwater in the Aegean Sea

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The Hellenic Ministry of Culture, Education and Religious Affairs has announced that remnants of a massive Bronze Age city have been discovered submerged in the Aegean Sea. The settlement, which dates back approximately 4,500 years, covers an area of 12 acres and consists of stone defensive structures, paved surfaces, pathways, towers, pottery, tools, and other artifacts.

The discovery was made by a team of experts from the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities, University of Geneva and the Swiss School of Archaeology at Kiladha Bay on the Peloponnese Peninsula south of Athens, while they were searching for evidence for the oldest village in Europe. While they were hoping to find traces dating back at least 8,000 years, the finding of the ancient city is no less significant.

The Ancient Greek City was found at Kiladha Bay on the Peloponnese Peninsula south of Athens.

The Ancient Greek City was found at Kiladha Bay on the Peloponnese Peninsula south of Athens. ( Wikipedia)

Ancient Fortifications

Spero News reports that researchers identified a series of huge horseshoe-shaped foundations next to a wall line, which are believed to have been towers used to defend the city. However, the structures are unique and have not been seen before during the Bronze Age period to which the ruins belongs. Professor Julien Beck of the University of Geneva said the foundations are of a “massive nature, unknown in Greece until now”.

"The importance of our discovery is partly due to the large size. There must have been a brick superstructure above a stone foundation. The chances of finding such walls under water are extremely low. The full size of the facility is not yet known. We do not know why it is surrounded by fortifications," Beck added.

A paved area that is believed to have been part of a fortified wall

A paved area that is believed to have been part of a fortified wall (Spero News ).

A Plethora of Artifacts

Beck explained that the discovery of the ancient city is important because of the quantity and quality of the artifacts that were retrieved, including pottery, red ceramics, stone tools, and obsidian blades dating to the Helladic period (3200 to 2050 BC). In fact, it was pottery fragments seen during training at the nearby Lambayanna beach that eventually led them to discover the city as they followed the trail of artifacts.

In total, more than 6,000 artifacts were pulled up from the ruins, which Beck has called an “archaeologist’s paradise.” The obsidian blades are believed to have come from volcanic rock sourced at the island of Milos in the Cyclades archipelago, inhabited since the third millennium.

International Business Times reports that the research team hopes the artifacts will enable them to “learn more about trade, shipping, and day to day life from the period”.

Weathered pottery sherds found at Lambayanna beach in the Pelopponese Peninsula of Greece

Weathered pottery sherds found at Lambayanna beach in the Pelopponese Peninsula of Greece ( Spero News ).

“The walls that were found by the team are contemporaneous with the pyramids at Giza that were built around 2600-2500 B.C., as well as the Cycladic civilization (3200 to 2000 BC), at the first Minoans on the island of Crete (2700-1200 BC),” reports Spero News. “However, they precede the first great Greek civilization, the Mycenaean (1650-1100 BC), by one thousand years.”

The researchers hope that further investigations at and around Lambayanna may provide new insight into a dense network of coastal settlements spread throughout the Aegean Sea.  

Featured image: A diver exploring the newly-discovered Greek city in the Aegean Sea ( Spero News ).

By April Holloway

Comments

The great flood, is'nt over, those cities did not sink, though it would have appeared that way. There are cataclysmic evens, floods for one, that do last many thousands of year before flooding in other manners, meaning entire oceans shift, the effect of gravity actually is altered.

cool

Once again, "qualified" researchers/archaeologists assume that the Giza pyramids were built around 2500BC. Great efforts to advance the human understanding of our ancient past.
This is really bad science. The Giza pyramids, at least some of them, are at least as old as 11 000BC.

Cool to see yet another discovery that points to the fact that a lot of our ancient past seems to be under water now. That probably includes the yet to be found Atlantis, which definitely existed.

Archaeologists know that the oceans have engulfed thousands of cities and human habitations around the world.  Only lack of money prevents more investigations.

Almost for sure, some massive catastrophe such as the flood described by the Sumericans, the Bible, and ancient records around the world happened.  

Unfortunately, most modern science lies buried in authoritarian mysticism and turns a blind eye to the facts.  Humans have not reached the pinnacle of our existence today, but rather humans lived much better in the distant past and a terrible catastrophe, or series of catastrophes, wiped out almost 100% of humans and many other life forms.

We know about the wipe out almost for a for sure fact from genetics.  Studies have shown that in the not very distant past, 70,000 years ago maximum, almost all humans died out.

We have survived as the stabilized mutant ancestors of the prior humans. To put it another way, modern humans have survived as the less intelligent and smaller and weaker versions of prior humans.

 

Tom Carberry

Something we change isn't going to affect the Sun. If we're doomed, we're doomed. Quit listening to the socialists promoting whatever crisis they can exploit that'll have the masses cringing in their sandals like has been happening for the last 20,000 years.

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