All  

Ancient Origins Tour IRAQ

Ancient Origins Tour IRAQ Mobile

The excavation site of Herculaneum. Source: Jerónimo Roure Pérez/CC BY-SA 4.0

Wooden Furniture of Herculaneum Preserved by Vesuvius (Video)

Print

The wooden furniture unearthed from the ruins of Herculaneum, preserved by the devastating eruption of Mount Vesuvius, provides an extraordinary window into the daily existence of ancient Romans. The meticulous craftsmanship evident in these artifacts reflects the skill and artistry of the carpenters, whose work has stood the test of time. Among the remarkable finds are intricately designed boats, bed frames, tables, and shrines, each bearing witness to the ingenuity and creativity of its makers. One particularly poignant discovery is a crib found amidst the remains of a family, a haunting reminder of the human tragedy that befell the city.

What sets Herculaneum apart is the level of preservation achieved, with carbonized wood retaining its structural integrity and even some original colors. The meticulous restoration efforts undertaken over the years have allowed visitors to marvel at these ancient treasures, offering a tangible connection to the past. Recent excavations, such as those in the Villa of the Papyri, continue to yield remarkable finds, including intricately inlaid tables and tripods adorned with ivory carvings depicting scenes of religious significance.

Exploring Herculaneum is not just an archaeological endeavor; it is a journey into the heart of a civilization frozen in time. As visitors walk among the remnants of wooden structures and furnishings, they are transported back to an era of prosperity and cultural richness, where craftsmanship flourished amidst the shadows of a looming volcano.

Top image: The excavation site of Herculaneum.  Source: Jerónimo Roure Pérez/CC BY-SA 4.0

By Robbie Mitchell

 
Robbie Mitchell's picture

Robbie

I’m a graduate of History and Literature from The University of Manchester in England and a total history geek. Since a young age, I’ve been obsessed with history. The weirder the better. I spend my days working as a freelance... Read More

Next article