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Pied Piper of Hamelin

The Disturbing True Story of the Pied Piper of Hamelin

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When, lo! as they reached the mountain-side, 
A wondrous portal opened wide,
As if a cavern was suddenly hollowed;
And the Piper advanced and the children followed,
And when all were in to the very last,
The door in the mountain-side shut fast.

Robert Browning, The Pied Piper of Hamelin: A Child’s Story

Many are familiar with the story of the Pied Piper of Hamelin. Few realise however, that the story is based on real events, which evolved over the years into a fairy tale made to scare children.

For those unfamiliar with the tale, it is set in 1284 in the town of Hamelin, Lower Saxony, Germany. This town was facing a rat infestation, and a piper, dressed in a coat of many coloured, bright cloth, appeared. This piper promised to get rid of the rats in return for a payment, to which the townspeople agreed too. Although the piper got rid of the rats by leading them away with his music, the people of Hamelin reneged on their promise. The furious piper left, vowing revenge. On the 26 th of July of that same year, the piper returned and led the children away, never to be seen again, just as he did the rats. Nevertheless, one or three children were left behind, depending on which version is being told. One of these children was lame, and could not keep up, another was deaf and could not hear the music, while the third one was blind and could not see where he was going.

The earliest known record of this story is from the town of Hamelin itself depicted in a stained glass window created for the church of Hamelin, which dates to around 1300 AD. Although it was destroyed in 1660, several written accounts have survived. The oldest comes from the Lueneburg manuscript (c 1440 – 50), which stated: “In the year of 1284, on the day of Saints John and Paul on June 26, by a piper, clothed in many kinds of colours, 130 children born in Hamelin were seduced, and lost at the place of execution near the koppen.”

The oldest known picture of the Pied Piper

The oldest known picture of the Pied Piper copied from the glass window of the Market Church in Hameln/Hamelin Germany (c.1300-1633). Image source: Wikimedia.

The supposed street where the children were last seen is today called Bungelosenstrasse (street without drums), as no one is allowed to play music or dance there. Incidentally, it is said that the rats were absent from earlier accounts, and only added to the story around the middle of the 16 th century. Moreover, the stained glass window and other primary written sources do not speak of the plague of rats.

If the children’s disappearance was not an act of revenge, then what was its cause? There have been numerous theories trying to explain what happened to the children of Hamelin. For instance, one theory suggests that the children died of some natural causes, and that the Pied Piper was the personification of Death. By associating the rats with the Black Death , it has been suggested that the children were victims of this plague. Yet, the Black Death was most severe in Europe between 1348 and 1350, more than half a century after the event in Hamelin. Another theory suggests that the children were actually sent away by their parents, due to the extreme poverty that they were living in. Yet another theory speculates that the children were participants of a doomed ‘Children’s Crusade’, and might have ended up in modern day Romania, or that the departure of Hamelin's children is tied to the Ostsiedlung, in which a number of Germans left their homes to colonize Eastern Europe. One of the darker theories even proposes that the Pied Piper was actually a paedophile who crept into the town of Hamelin to abduct children during their sleep.

One of the darker themed representations of the Pied Piper of Hamelin

One of the darker themed representations of the Pied Piper of Hamelin. Credit: Lui-Gon-Jinn

Historical records suggest that the story of the Pied Piper of Hamelin was a real event that took place. Nevertheless, the transmission of this story undoubtedly evolved and changed over the centuries, although to what extent is unknown, and the mystery of what really happened to those children has never been solved. The story also raises the question, if the Pied Piper of Hamelin was based on reality, how much truth is there in other fairy tales that we were told as children?

Featured image: An illustration of the Pied Piper of Hamelin . Credit: Monlster

By Ḏḥwty

References

Anderson, D., 2012. The Pied Piper of Hamelin: The facts behind the fairy tale. [Online]
Available at: http://www.examiner.com/article/the-pied-piper-of-hamelin-the-facts-behind-the-fairy-tale

Ashliman, D. L., 2013. The Pied Piper of Hameln and related legends from other towns. [Online]
Available at: http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/hameln.html

Cuervo, M. J. P., 2010. The Lost Children of Hamelin. [Online]
Available at: http://www.forteantimes.com/features/articles/3805/the_lost_children_of_hamelin.html

Dennis, 2011. The Truth Behind the Legend of the Pied Piper. [Online]
Available at: http://www.topsecretwriters.com/2011/01/the-truth-behind-the-legend-of-the-pied-piper/

Foster, N., 2014. Is the Pied Piper of Hamelin Based on an Actual Event?. [Online]
Available at: http://www.wisegeek.com/is-the-pied-piper-of-hamelin-based-on-an-actual-event.htm

McGarth, J., 2014. Was there really a pied piper of Hamelin?. [Online]
Available at: http://history.howstuffworks.com/history-vs-myth/pied-piper.htm

Pearson, L., 2005. On the trail of the real Pied Piper. [Online]
Available at: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4277707.stm

Wikipedia, 2014. Pied Piper of Hamelin. [Online]
Available at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pied_Piper_of_Hamelin

Comments

I really like your idea about the guards of the Vatican, now that you mention it, the description of the Pied Piper (and more specifically, his clothes) could lead someone to make a correlation with these guards.. but if it was truly guards of the Vatican who have took away the children.. why ? And the townpeople should have known that they were from the Vatican, don't you think ?

I have two thoughts...

1. The many colored clothing along with the accompanying picture brings to mind the guards of the Vatican. Perhaps a recruitment? Train them while young, perhaps the children were some sort of tribute to the Pope, or God?

2. Being taken to a cave -a possible mining operation that would require people of small stature?

The event was important enough to make a record of, but no explanation. Weird.

Odin was certainly cruel enough to take an entire generation as pawns in one of his complex schemes. There are allusions in the myths suggesting he and Loki were very compatible companions, although any actual myths of Odin and Loki going out causing trouble were left out of any myths I have read. One surviving myth has Odin arranging for all the employees of a Giant to accidentally behead each other so that he could get hired quickly, in order to steal the Mead of Wisdom from this Giant.
Wotan is a little different in several important respects from Odin, as I understand it, one being that rather than the ruler, Wotan is more of an outsider, a Merlin type. Which would make him a perfect suspect for being the Pied Piper, if it did happen, and would make it very believable that the story was a leftover fragment of Pre-christian myth. (Some would say that both could be true. I am one such individual.)

i don't think Hamelin is along the Rhine River. It is somewhere going North on the route to Hannover, Bremerhaven (Saxon-Anhalt region while Rhine River is in the Pfalz Westfalen region along Koblenz-Cologne route)

Hamelin is on the River Rhine; I think it is an island, but the river runs through a deep valley, so there could be caves in the side of the valley. If you travel on the river in a cruise ship, the ship's master used to tell the story, but that was fifty years ago. I would imagine that the story is still told.

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