All  

Ancient Origins Tour IRAQ

Ancient Origins Tour IRAQ Mobile

AI close-up portrait of Dracula baring his sharp fangs, with a predatory glare in a dark room.		Source: EOL STUDIOS

Bloodsuckers Through the Ages - A History of Vampires (Video)

Print

Vampire lore, originating from Eastern European folklore, has fascinated and terrified people for centuries, with various creatures haunting the imaginations of different cultures worldwide. Among them, the Upyr stands out as a prevalent type, feared for its iron-like teeth and penchant for preying on children before feasting on their parents. This vampire, unlike its nocturnal modern counterparts, roamed from noon till midnight, instilling terror across Ukraine and Eastern Belarus.

But the Upyr was not the only vampiric creature to haunt the region. Variations such as the Upiór in Poland, known for its barbed tongue and affinity for sleeping in blood, and the Upor from Byelorussian folklore, capable of transforming and riding horses, added layers to the mythos. Similar creatures appeared in other parts of the world, such as the Manananggal in the Philippines, a winged beast with fangs that could separate its upper torso from its lower body, and the Adze in Ghana, which could transform into a firefly to suck victims' blood.

This fear of vampires reached its peak during outbreaks of disease, such as the Great Vampire Epidemic, where superstition and ignorance led to gruesome rituals to prevent the dead from returning. While our understanding of disease has evolved, the enduring allure of vampires continues to captivate global audiences, reflecting humanity's timeless fascination with mortality and the supernatural.

Top image: AI close-up portrait of Dracula baring his sharp fangs, with a predatory glare in a dark room.              Source: EOL STUDIOS

By Robbie Mitchell

 
Robbie Mitchell's picture

Robbie

I’m a graduate of History and Literature from The University of Manchester in England and a total history geek. Since a young age, I’ve been obsessed with history. The weirder the better. I spend my days working as a freelance... Read More

Next article