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Two pages from the Voynich Manuscript. Has the Voynich Manuscript code finally been cracked?

Has the Enigmatic Voynich Manuscript Code Finally Been Cracked?

Named after Wilfrid Voynich (1865 - 1930), a Polish revolutionary, antiquarian, and bibliophile who operated one of the largest rare book businesses in the world, the Voynich manuscript is a brightly illustrated hand-written vellum codex in a currently unidentified writing and visual communication system. However, according to a non-peer reviewed paper published in John's Hopkins University digital journal, a Canadian researcher has finally cracked the six century old Voynich Manuscript code. But has he really?

History and Famous Attempts to Decode the Voynich Manuscript

Purchased by Voynich in 1912, the manuscript has been Carbon-dated to between 1404 -1438 AD and it is thought to have been composed in Northern Italy during the Italian Renaissance. Measuring 23.5 by 16.2 by 5 cm (9.3 by 6.4 by 2.0 in) the text is written from left to right. With around 240 pages collected into 18 quires, and because many pages fold out, the artifact brings to adults all the same intrigue and interactivity as pop-up books offer children.

Some pages of the Voynich Manuscript fold out to show larger diagrams. (Public Domain)

Some pages of the Voynich Manuscript fold out to show larger diagrams. ( Public Domain )

Hundreds of professional cryptographers, including American and British codebreakers from both World War I and II, have attempted to decipher the text and interpret the images; but none of the hypotheses proposed thus far account for all, or even most, of its many parts. Literary specialists and historians have proposed a long list of possible authors including: Roger Bacon, John Dee, Edward Kelley, Giovanni Fontana, or even Voynich himself. In 1969, the Voynich Manuscript was donated by Hans P. Kraus to Yale University's Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, where it is currently catalogued under call number MS 408.

Mr. Voynich among his books in Soho Square circa 1899. (Public Domain)

Mr. Voynich among his books in Soho Square circa 1899. ( Public Domain )

The manuscripts visual content is generally described as being: herbal, botanical, astronomical, biological, and pharmaceutical, and specialists have observed characters from Latin/Greek/Old Cyrillic/ Croatian Glagolitic cursive, and Hebrew. Detailed studies of the parchment, cover, binding, ink, paint, and retouching methods are available online and we will waste no time on these elements in this article. Our clear purpose here is to look at the solution recently presented by Canadian researcher, Mr. Amet Ardic, who believes the manuscript contains “shapes meaning prefixes and suffixes in distinctive letters, resembling the Turkish language used in his home country.”

Detail of an unidentified plant on page 78r of Voynich manuscript, in a part of the text which has become known as the “biological” section. (Public Domain)

Detail of an unidentified plant on page 78r of Voynich manuscript, in a part of the text which has become known as the “biological” section. ( Public Domain )

Is Turkish the Key to Cracking the Voynich Manuscript Code?

Mr. Ardic claims he and his son have discovered more than 300 words in the Voynich Manuscript Code. His research paper was published on the John's Hopkins University digital journal. In his online video presentation , which has been watched almost a million times, Mr. Ardic concluded that the manuscript was written in a poetic, rhythmic method called "Phonemic Orthography" which describes speech visually.

Mr. Ardic first noticed the Turkish character “Turqu" seven times in the Voynich manuscript” and he made another convincing observation in the illustration featured in FOLIO 67-R, known as the “astronomy” section. A circle divided into 12 sections suggested to Mr. Ardic that it might be a calendar and each piece may represent one of the 12 lunar months.

Top: Folio 67r displays a circular design with 12 inner sections which are believed to represent the 12 annual lunar months. (Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University) Bottom: Mr. Ardic and his son say common suffixes are used among different letters. (Gigazine)
Top: Folio 67r displays a circular design with 12 inner sections which are believed to represent the 12 annual lunar months. (Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University) Bottom: Mr. Ardic and his son say common suffixes are used among different letters. (Gigazine)

Top: Folio 67r displays a circular design with 12 inner sections which are believed to represent the 12 annual lunar months. ( Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University ) Bottom: Mr. Ardic and his son say common suffixes are used among different letters. ( Gigazine)

To advance his theory, the researcher then replaced the characters detailed within each of the 12 suspected months with modern Turku characters, for example; October is pronounced “Ogzaf" and in the old Turkish dictionary it is spelled “Yuzai.” The word essentially means the season “fall.” The word "Ai" means “two moons”. From these, Mr. Ardic translated the letters of ‘October’ to mean "autumn moon.” Extending this system of interpretation across the ‘moon’ circle,  further correspondences were noted, for example: November is written as “Sepel”, which when translated to modern Turkish “Seper Ayi” means "moon of rain.” Furthermore, July translates to "the month of harvest.”

What you have read and seen of the Voynich manuscript thus far might have already convinced you that it has been successfully deciphered, but this would be a hastily drawn conclusion before taking a closer look at Mr. Ardic’s claims from alternative points of view; an activity which makes it clear that not everybody is buying his ancient Turkish theory.

Screen shot from promotional video showing Mr. Ardic researching a copy of the Voynich Manuscript. (Voynich Manuscript Research/YouTube Screenshot)

Screen shot from promotional video showing Mr. Ardic researching a copy of the Voynich Manuscript. (Voynich Manuscript Research/ YouTube Screenshot )

Stand Back… Here Comes The Skeptical Opinion To Ruin Everything

Before we begin, I must make it clear that I am not a trained linguist, but I am an experienced investigator, and in this instance my case book is full of niggling inconsistencies which we will try to rationalize before drawing a conclusion.

Firstly, it is important to remember that Turkish is a very well documented language and the Voynich manuscript has been studied by professional linguists from all over the world for over 500 years. Mr. Ardic, with all and absolute respect, is an electrical engineer. Any balanced juror would have to agree that the probability is much, much higher that, just like Egyptian hieroglyphics , cuneiform, Mayan, and Linear B , so too would the Voynich Manuscript most likely be decoded by a linguist.

Secondly, if you had just cracked the code of one of the world’s oldest cyphers, the video releasing your amazing findings to the world might begin with a simple table or chart translating the encoded characters into modern letters with a step by step decipherment; letter by letter, word by word, page by page. Contrary to this, one would need to watch the presentation on Ardic’s interpretation of the Voynich Manuscript code five times to really understand the theory. This suggests the researcher possibly found a seed, dug around it until he found a root, then a plant.

Detail of a page in Folio 33-V of the Voynich Manuscript. (Gigazine)

Detail of a page in Folio 33-V of the Voynich Manuscript. ( Gigazine)

I must now slow down a little on my unrelentingly skeptical attitude because Mr. Ardic and supporters of this hypothesis could firmly argue that Yale University made the manuscript public in the first place because not one of the world’s PhD linguists was able to decipher it for over five centuries. What is more, he might refer us to the quite brilliant book Wikinomics by author Don Tapscott, who provides many great examples of outsiders and amateur enthusiasts disrupting existing fields. And speaking personally, if we were to all underestimate the capacity of enthusiasts I wouldn’t even be writing this article! Not to mention, the world is full of highly advanced thinkers without PhDs applying themselves as software engineers, developers, and hackers – and they are running rings around the world’s national security and banking systems.

Mr. Ardic claims to have studied ancient Turkish languages with his son and they were able to pinpoint the Voynich writing style to an ancient phonetic variant. But his findings assume that there is only one language encoded into the manuscript. Why not 2, 5, or 12? That would go a long way to explaining why only a small part of the content can be related to Turkish.

Detail from Voynich Manuscript, page 50; Folio 25v “dragon” as the detail is agreed to most resemble a classic mythological dragon. (Public Domain)

Detail from Voynich Manuscript, page 50; Folio 25v “ dragon” as the detail is agreed to most resemble a classic mythological dragon. ( Public Domain )

What I find really interesting in all this is that the online amateur research community attributes a selection of different languages to the Voynich manuscript. When these proposed countries of origin are looked at on a map they form an approximate geographical area which might suggest the manuscript was not actually written in northern Italy, as many scholars have argued.

What is more, many researchers see Serbo-Croatian, Ottoman, and Old Turkic - it might be prudent for linguists to take these observations and look closer at Croatian Glagolitic cursive and Angular Glagolitic, which might have in part evolved from Turkic language systems. And then, it must be considered that the Voynich manuscript might be an amalgamation of Glagolitic and Turkic cultures condensing shared botanical, pharmaceutical, astronomical traditions, and craft knowledge.

Whether Mr. Ardic’s findings will stand up to peer review or not will remain to be seen, but there is no part of me that is not inspired by the dedication both he and his son have committed to furthering our understanding of the code within the Voynich Manuscript.

Top Image: Two pages from the Voynich Manuscript. Has the Voynich Manuscript code finally been cracked? Source: Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University

By Ashley Cowie

References

Gigazine. (2018) “A theory that Voynich manuscript which was not decoded for over 100 years is written "in old Turkish" appeared.” Gigazine. Available at: https://gigazine.net/gsc_news/en/20180320-turkish-engineer-translate-voynich-manuscript/

Stolte, D. (2011) "Experts determine age of book 'nobody can read'".  PhysOrg. Available at: https://phys.org/news/2011-02-experts-age.html

Tapscott, D. & Williams, A.D. (2006) Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything.   https://books.google.com.co/books?id=-WUhErZgmpoC&pg=PA24&redir_esc=y

Voynich-manuscript.com. (n.d.) “How to Read the Voynich Manuscript.” Voynich-manuscript.com. Available at: https://www.voynich-manuscript.com/general/how-to-read-the-voynich-manuscript

Voynich Ninja. (2018) “Voynich Ninja Discussions in Medievalia.” Voynich Ninja. Available at: https://voynich.ninja/

Yale University Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. (2012) “Cipher Manuscript.”

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library Yale University. Available at: https://brbl-dl.library.yale.edu/vufind/Record/3519597

Comments

With all due respect to Mr. Ardic and his son, I think we are no closer to deciphering this manuscript today than when it was written some 500 to 600 years ago.

Looking at some of the illustrations of a strange looking animal (a hybrid for sure), bizarre flora, and impossible text, I've come to my own conclusion. I think that the person(s) who compiled this work of art was just "putting us on" and died laughing as he thought about all the experts/specialists who will be agonizing with "blood, sweat, and tears" over what the author's secret was that he took to the grave with him.

In other words, I think this work is a canard, a prevarication, a "snow job", the biggest con-job of all con-jobs. So there! This guy, whoever he was, is "busted"!

P. S. If this is too much to bear for some, please disregard all-of-the-above. Cheers, Pilgrims.

There is a key to cipher the Voynich manuscript.
The key to the cipher manuscript placed in the manuscript. It is placed throughout the text. Part of the key hints is placed on the sheet 14. With her help was able to translate a few dozen words that are completely relevant to the theme sections.
The Voynich manuscript is not written with letters. It is written in signs. Characters replace the letters of the alphabet one of the ancient language. Moreover, in the text there are 2 levels of encryption. I figured out the key by which the first section could read the following words: hemp, wearing hemp; food, food (sheet 20 at the numbering on the Internet); to clean (gut), knowledge, perhaps the desire, to drink, sweet beverage (nectar), maturation (maturity), to consider, to believe (sheet 107); to drink; six; flourishing; increasing; intense; peas; sweet drink, nectar, etc. Is just the short words, 2-3 sign. To translate words with more than 2-3 characters requires knowledge of this ancient language. The fact that some symbols represent two letters. In the end, the word consisting of three characters can fit up to six letters. Three letters are superfluous. In the end, you need six characters to define the semantic word of three letters. Of course, without knowledge of this language make it very difficult even with a dictionary.
And most important. In the manuscript there is information about "the Holy Grail".
I'm willing to share information.
Nikolai.

I’m sure AI will solve the problem or the aliens. We’re too dumb for that.

The author says;

"But his findings assume that there is only one language encoded into the manuscript. Why not 2, 5, or 12?"

Is there any convincing trace on multiple languages other then Turkish in the manuscript? If not, why need to focus on looking for multiple languages in the manuscript instead understand and decipher it with available Turkish tool which has been developed by Ahmet? Ahmet has already established a base to decipher Turkish base words and figured out over 300 words. It should be an easy job to confirm his finding (at least words) for linguists. Nevertheless, Ahmet has already convinced Turkish speaking countries with his finding despite ignorance non-Turkish speaking countries linguists.

If I could get $.01 for every time someone claims to have deciphered the Voynich manuscript!

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