All  

Ancoent Origins Black Friday

Composite of in-article images.

Weekly Top Stories: A Quick Catch Up On What You Missed

Print

In last week’s top stories; Sheriff of Nottingham ring, an egg producing mountain, Occultist Aleister Crowley’s House, Egyptian beer mega-factory, and hopeful treasure hunters.

Gold Ring that Belonged to Real Sheriff of Nottingham Sold

Gold signet ring bearing the coat of arms of Sir Matthew Jenison, once Sheriff of Nottingham. (Hansons Auctioneers)

Gold signet ring bearing the coat of arms of Sir Matthew Jenison, once Sheriff of Nottingham. ( Hansons Auctioneers )

On March 24, Hansons Auctioneers in Derbyshire, England began taking bids on one of the more fascinating historical artifacts they’ve put up for auction. The item they’re selling is a flashy golden signet ring that once belonged to the High Sheriff of Nottingham.

No, not  that Sheriff of Nottingham . The Sheriff who sought in vain to capture the virtuous outlaw Robin Hood is strictly the stuff of legends.

The ring being auctioned off belonged to a real-life, 17th century version of the Sheriff of Nottingham. This particular sheriff never chased  Robin Hood  around Sherwood Forest. But he did arrest actual lawbreakers who were caught carrying out their illegal affairs within the city limits of the real Nottingham, and he did so while flashing a fancy piece of finger jewelry that helped attest to his high status.

Read on…

‘On the Verge’ of Finding $20 Billion Lemminkäinen Hoard. Or Are They?

Volunteers helping the Temple Twelve in their quest to unearth the Lemminkäinen Hoard. (Carl Borgen)

Volunteers helping the Temple Twelve in their quest to unearth the Lemminkäinen Hoard. ( Carl Borgen )

If you search the internet for information about the Lemminkäinen Hoard the results are greatly skeptical in nature. This is mostly because back in 2018 a team of treasure hunters told  The Science Times  they were “on the verge of discovering $20 billion [£15 billion] worth of treasure.” At that time they told  Mail Online    that while more and more people have learned about the “almost found” billions of treasures, little was known about the origins of the famed Lemminkäinen Hoard.

A 12-strong  treasure hunting  team are convinced a huge  stash of gold and jewels is waiting to be found in an underground temple located within the Sibbosberg  cave system in Sipoo, about 20 miles (32 km) east of  Finland's capital, Helsinki. Now, they are back in the news claiming they are even closer to finding the jewel stash, which they call “one of the largest and most valuable treasure troves in the world.” But does it even exist?

Read on…

Egyptian Beer Factory Could Produce 100,000 Pints per Batch!

The remains of pots found at Abydos in Egypt are believed to be part of a giant ancient beer factory and were used to mix the grains and water. (Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities)

The remains of pots found at Abydos in Egypt are believed to be part of a giant ancient beer factory and were used to mix the grains and water. ( Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities )

Archaeologists in Egypt have unearthed the earliest known “Beer Mega-factory,” an ancient beer factory that was producing mind-altering brews at least 5,000 years ago – on an industrial scale. This adds to a long line of ancient beer-related discoveries which have helped the archaeological community understand more about the history of this ancient beverage.

Read on…

Biggest Aztec Starfish Altar Ever, Found in Templo Mayor, Mexico City!

The largest Aztec starfish altar was found last year in the biggest temple, Templo Major, in the ancient city of Tenochtitlán (Mexico City) along with jaguar bones and countless seashells. (INAH)

The largest Aztec starfish altar was found last year in the biggest temple, Templo Major, in the ancient city of Tenochtitlán (Mexico City) along with jaguar bones and countless seashells. ( INAH)

Archaeologists from Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) found the largest ever Aztec starfish altar offering site at Templo Mayor, the largest Aztec temple. Templo Mayor was located in the Aztec capital city of Tenochtitlán, in what is now Mexico City. “In total there are 164 starfishes there, which makes it the altar with the largest number of starfishes we’ve found up until now,” said the  INAH report  .

Read on…

New Film Shatters 'Fake News' of Occultist Aleister Crowley’s Scottish Boleskine House

An aerial view of what remains of Boleskine House, owned by occultist Aleister Crowley from 1899 to 1913, which is the subject of a new film by Scottish filmmaker Ashley Cowie. Source: Ashley Cowie /

An aerial view of what remains of Boleskine House, owned by occultist Aleister Crowley from 1899 to 1913, which is the subject of a new film by Scottish filmmaker Ashley Cowie. Source: Ashley Cowie /  www.thebeastoflochness.com/

A filmmaker from the north of Scotland has vowed to dissolve decades of “fake news” surrounding a famous Boleskine House Jacobite era hunting lodge, and center of Aleister Crowley’s “magical operation” for 14 years on the banks of Loch Ness, Scotland.

Perhaps best known as the former home of the infamous English occultist, author and artist Aleister Crowley (1875-1947), Boleskine House has become “iron-clad in pop-cultural myths.”

A new documentary film,  Beast of Loch Ness  promises to strip back the “pop-cultural moss” that surrounds Boleskine House, which was previously owned not only by Crowley (1899-1913), but also by Led Zeppelin musician Jimmy Page from 1970 to 1992.

Read on…

China’s Mysterious Egg-Laying Mountain That Spews Out Stone Eggs

‘Eggs’ protruding from the side of the egg-laying mountain in China. (AsiaWire)

‘Eggs’ protruding from the side of the egg-laying mountain in China. (AsiaWire)

Mount Gandang, a mountain in the southwest region of China, has an interesting phenomenon that geologists, researchers, and locals have been observing for decades. Located in the province of Guizhou, the rocky walls of the base of the mountain include a cliff that locals refer to as “Chan Dan Ya,” Mandarin for “egg-laying cliff,” due to its ability to “lay” stone “eggs” every 30 years. But, where are they coming from?

Read on…

Top image: Composite of in-article images.

By Ancient Origins

Next article