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Story Of Ancient Stone

The 385000-year-old stone tools from the Attirampakkam archaeological site in India were made with a sophisticated Levallois technique that experts thought had arrived much later in India.

385000-year-old ?

If they are 385000-years-old, they probably weren't made by humans because we were still swinging from the trees back then. These dates from India are impossibly old. How do they arrive at them?

They have also found 300,000

They have also found 300,000 petroglyphs and stone tools in Mexico at the Hueyatlaco site dated geologically with the volcanic ash they were embedded in. These tools were similar to ones in Africa of the same age – suggesting people were sailing across the Atlantic way back then. They may not have been the latest breed of Homo sapiens, but science is now showing Homo sapiens interbreeded with Homo erectus – such as Peking man in Asia and Java man in SE Asia, not sure about the ones in Africa – probably were a few there. Homo Erectus has been around for nearly a million years and probably wasnt as dumb as many people think. Homo Erectus wasnt as mobile as each continent had their own version, but maybe there was an interim breed that we haven’t identified yet.  Neanderthals in Europe were around 200,000 years ago and were very similar to modern man ,Then there are the Denovisians and an unrecognised one in Oceania. So no surprise about this find in India. We are looking for an early version of Homo sapien that was capable of making sailing boats and tools. Genetics and a lucky excavation one day may come up with the answer.

 

Gobekli Tepe in Turkey is

Gobekli Tepe in Turkey is considered to be one of the first temples in the world, predating Stonehenge by about 6,000 years — its history dates back to the 10th millennium BCE. The site was abandoned after the pre-pottery neolithic era, or about the 8th millennium BCE. 

The site comprises some 200 pillars in 20 circular installations. Each of the pillars measures up to six meters and weighs some 10 tons. In the middle of the site are two large T-shaped pillars of about 60 tons. Reliefs of various cinema hd animals such as foxes, ducks, and wild boars twist and turn their way up the surfaces of the pillars.

Its discoverer, Klaus Schmidt, believed it was a place of worship, attracting hunter-gatherers from Africa and the Levant, an area in the Eastern Mediterranean region.