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Sleeping goddess statue in the Lost Gardens of Heligan.

The Lost Gardens of Heligan: Rediscovering a Centuries-Old Paradise

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The Lost Gardens of Heligan is one of the most well-renowned botanical gardens in the United Kingdom, yet for decades it had lain abandoned and forgotten.

Developed over the centuries by several generations of a Cornish family, the spectacular gardens fell into disuse when World War I broke out, only to be re-discovered in 1990, restored, and opened to the public in 1992.

A Family Project

The gardens of Heligan are located near Mevagissey, in the southwestern English county of Cornwall. In the Cornish language, the gardens are known as Lowarth Helygen , which means ‘Willow Tree Garden’. The gardens are associated with the Tremayne family and are still part of their Heligan estate.

Heligan House. (Dr Neil Clifton/CC BY SA 2.0)

Heligan House. (Dr Neil Clifton/ CC BY SA 2.0 )

The family’s history in the area is traced all the way back to the 13th century, when Heligan Manor was first built. It was, however, only during the 18th century that the gardens began to be built by the Tremayne family. Each generation made additions to this ‘family project’ and the gardens grew.

‘The Jungle’ at the Lost Gardens of Heligan. (Melanie Nakisa/CC BY SA 3.0)

‘The Jungle’ at the Lost Gardens of Heligan. (Melanie Nakisa/ CC BY SA 3.0 )

The expansion of the gardens meant that more manpower was required to maintain and improve them. To achieve this, the Tremayne family hired many local gardeners. Just before the First World War broke out, for instance, there were as many as 22 gardeners in the service of the Tremaynes. By 1916, however, only eight men were left to tend to the gardens. The rest of the gardeners had gone to fight in the war and never returned.

Neglect and Resurrection of the Lost Gardens of Heligan

The gardens fell into further neglect when the then owner, Jack Tremayne, left Cornwall for Italy when the war was over, and had his estate leased out. Thus, the Heligan estate, including its gardens, was occupied by different tenants over the next few decades, including the American Army, who used the house as a base.

The Italian Garden at the Lost Gardens of Heligan. (Chris Wood/CC BY SA 3.0)

The Italian Garden at the Lost Gardens of Heligan. (Chris Wood/ CC BY SA 3.0 )

The gardens continued to deteriorate, and would have been lost forever, had it not been for two men, John Willis and Tim Smit. When Jack Tremayne died, the estate went into the ownership of a trust that was associated with several members of the extended Tremayne family. One of these was John Willis, who lived in the area, and introduced the gardens to Tim Smit, a record producer. The collaboration between the two men resulted in the re-discovery of the gardens in 1990. Soon, the gardens were restored, and the restoration work was made into a six-part television series in 1996.

An Award-Winning Tourist Destination

In 1992, the Lost Gardens of Heligan were opened to the public. Since then, it has become a popular tourist destination, stimulating the economy of the area. Since then, the gardens have been improved by its trustees on a regular basis and reached various landmarks over the years.

In 2010, for instance, the gardens recorded its four millionth visitor, whilst 2013 saw the completion of an ‘insect hotel’ on the Georgian Ride. Numerous awards have been won by the gardens, including the Cornwall Tourism Awards – Garden of the Year – Silver Award (2013), and the Cornwall Tourism Awards – ‘Winner of Winners’, ‘Garden & Country House of the Year’ & Silver in the Wildlife Friendly Business category (2014).    

Oak "Georgian Ride" in the Lost Valley. (Copyleft)

Oak "Georgian Ride" in the Lost Valley. ( Copyleft)

The gardens are notable for various attractions. Arguably the most unique of these is its pineapple pit, which is a method of growing pineapples in a colder climate. This technique was invented during the Victorian era, though it became obsolete following the introduction of steam ships, which made it cheaper to transport the fruit from abroad. It has been said the pineapple pit is the only remaining one in Europe today, and in 2009 it produced its first fruit in three years.

Another highlight of the gardens is the floral arts commissioned when the gardens were being restored. These include the Giant’s Head and the Mud Maid. Of course, the Lost Gardens of Heligan are also known for the different gardens that were created by the Tremayne family. These include the Northern Gardens, the Flower Garden, and the Melon Yard, all of which were built during the time of Henry Hawkins Tremayne (1766 – 1829), as well as the Italian Garden, which was built between 1906 and 1907.

The Giant’s Head sculpture in 2004. (Walt Jabsco/CC BY NC ND 2.0)

The Giant’s Head sculpture in 2004. (Walt Jabsco/ CC BY NC ND 2.0 )

Top Image: Sleeping goddess statue in the Lost Gardens of Heligan. Source: imgur

By Wu Mingren

References

Andrews, S., 2017. The Lost Gardens of Heligan in Cornwall, restored after decades of neglect. [Online]
Available at: https://www.thevintagenews.com/2017/11/28/the-lost-gardens-of-heligan/

Herbert, K., 2018. Take the kids to … the Lost Gardens of Heligan, Cornwall. [Online]
Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2018/feb/07/lost-gardens-of-heligan-cornwall-review-family-day-trip-uk-activities

serflac, 2018. Lost Gardens of Heligan. [Online]
Available at: https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/lost-gardens-of-heligan

The Lost Gardens of Heligan, 2015. The Lost Gardens of Heligan. [Online]
Available at: http://heligan.com/

The Royal Horticultural Society , 2018. The Lost Gardens Of Heligan. [Online]
Available at: https://www.rhs.org.uk/gardens/GardenDetails/THE-LOST-GARDENS-OF-HELIGAN

Visit Cornwall , 2018. Lost Gardens of Heligan. [Online]
Available at: https://www.visitcornwall.com/things-to-do/attractions/south-coast/mevagissey/lost-gardens-heligan

www.greatgardensofcornwall.co.uk, 2018. The Lost Gardens of Heligan. [Online]
Available at: http://www.greatgardensofcornwall.co.uk/gardens/the-lost-gardens-of-heligan/

Comments

Cousin_Jack's picture

Gardens such as this are a common scene in Cornwall, usually associated with the manors of Lords. Trerice, Tehidy, Pendarves, all were manors with big gardens,

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