Fermented shark, hákarl, is an example of a culinary tradition that has continued from the settlement of Iceland in the 9th century to this day.
Friday, November 27, 2015 - 02:50

The Vikings are famous for their great feasting halls, in which an image of a rowdy bunch of beer-drinking men gnawing on meaty bones comes to mind.  But what did they really consume besides beer and mead in their dining rooms?

Artwork depicting a Tibetan Mastiff from the Qing Dynasty.
Friday, November 27, 2015 - 00:52

It is generally accepted that the dog is one of the earliest animals that was domesticated by human beings. In today’s society, the dog is regarded by many as ‘man’s best friend’. This view has been shared by many ancient societies as well, including the ancient Chinese.

: “The First Thanksgiving 1621, oil on canvas by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1899). The painting shows common misconceptions about the event that persist to modern times: Pilgrims did not wear such outfits, and the Wampanoag are dressed in the style of Native Americans from the Great
Thursday, November 26, 2015 - 20:30

As the leaves turn beautiful golden and fiery red hues, and the weather gets colder and people prepare for the oncoming winter in the Northern Hemisphere, Americans enjoy the annual celebration of Thanksgiving.

Painting entitled ‘Abulcasis blistering a patient in the hospital at Cordova.’
Thursday, November 26, 2015 - 14:50

The period from the 8th century until the 13th century AD is commonly referred to as the Islamic Golden Age. During this era, the Islamic world produced numerous scholars who contributed greatly to various branches of human knowledge, including philosophy, mathematics, and astronomy.

Front view of the mummy of the "Younger Lady".
Thursday, November 26, 2015 - 02:52

French Egyptologist Marc Gabolde, specialist in the Eighteenth Dynasty and the Amarna period, argues that the mummy known as the "Younger Lady" discovered almost a century ago, is actually the famous and much sought after Queen Nefertiti.

This skeleton was of a woman who was a first generation Londoner with northern European ancestry who was likely born in Britain. She was buried with grave goods that made researchers think she was of high status in her community.
Thursday, November 26, 2015 - 00:46

London appears to have been just as ethnically diverse when it was founded by ancient Romans as it is now, when only 45 percent of its residents are Caucasian and people of various neighborhoods speak more than 100 languages.


Archaeology News on Human Origins, Ancient Places and Mysterious Phenomena


Our Mission

Ancient Origins seeks to uncover, what we believe, is one of the most important pieces of knowledge we can acquire as human beings – our beginnings.

While many believe that we already hold such knowledge, our view is that there still exists a multitude of anomalies and mysteries in humanity's past that deserve further examination.

We therefore wish to foster an open community that is dedicated to investigating, understanding and explaining the origins of our species on planet earth. To this end, we aim to organize, support and even finance efforts in this direction.

Our aim is to move beyond theories and to present a thorough examination of current research and evidence and to offer alternative viewpoints and explanations to those currently held by mainstream science and archaeology.

Come with us on a journey to explore lost civilisations, sacred writings, ancient places, unexplained artefacts and scientific mysteries while we seek to reconstruct and retell the story of our beginnings.

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Funerary Mask - Museum of Gold, Bogota, Colombia
Tayos Caves unknown entrance
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