Five Legendary Lost Cities that have Never Been Found

Five Legendary Lost Cities that have Never Been Found

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In 1545, Conquistadores Lázaro Fonte and Hernán Perez de Quesada attempted to drain Lake Guatavita. As they did so, they found gold along its shores, fueling their suspicion that the lake contained a treasure of riches. They worked for three months, with workers forming a bucket chain, but they were unable to drain the lake sufficiently to reach any treasures deep within the lake. In 1580, another attempt to drain the lake was made by business entrepreneur Antonio de Sepúlveda. Once again, various pieces of gold were found along the shores, but the treasure at the depths of the lake remained concealed. Other searches were conducted on Lake Guatavita, with estimates that the lake could contain up to $300 million in gold, with no luck in finding the treasures. All searches came to a halt when the Colombian government declared the lake a protected area in 1965. Nonetheless, the search for El Dorado continues, even without the ability to search Lake Guatavita. The legends of the Muisca tribe, the Gilded One and their ritualistic sacrifice of treasures have transformed over time into today’s tale of El Dorado, lost city of gold.

The Lost Desert Cities of Dubai: The Hidden History

The Lost Desert Cities of Dubai: The Hidden History

Dubai cultivates an ultra-modern image of dazzling architecture and effortless wealth. Yet its deserts conceal forgotten cities and a hidden history which reveal how its early inhabitants adapted and overcame dramatic past climate change.

One of the most famous lost cities of Arabia – tantalizingly so because historians have known it existed from written records but simply could not find it – is the medieval city of Julfar. Home to the legendary Arabian seafarer Ahmed ibn Majid, as well as allegedly to the fictional Sindbad the Sailor, Julfar thrived for a thousand years before falling into ruin and disappearing from human memory for almost two centuries. Unlike other desert cities, Julfar was a thriving port, in fact the hub of southern Gulf Arabic trade in the Middle Ages.

Julfar was known to be somewhere on the Persian Gulf coast north of Dubai, but the actual site was only found by archaeologists in the 1960s. The earliest signs of settlement found on the site date from the 6th century, by which time its inhabitants were already trading as far afield as India and the Far East on a routine basis.

The 10th to 14th centuries were a golden age for Julfar and for long-distance Arab trading and seafaring, with Arab navigators routinely traveling halfway around the world. Arabs had sailed into European waters long before Europeans succeeded in navigating through the Indian Ocean and into the Persian Gulf, for instance. As the main base for these voyages and trade, Julfar was the largest and most important city in the southern Gulf for over a thousand years. Arab merchants routinely made the mammoth eighteen-month sea voyage as far as China, and traded almost everything imaginable.

Such a valuable commercial centre attracted constant attention from rival powers though. The Portuguese took control in the 16th century, by which time Julfar was a substantial city of around 70,000 people. A century later the Persians seized it, only to lose it in 1750 to the Qawasim tribe from Sharjah who established themselves next-door at Ras al-Khaimah, which they continue to rule to this day, leaving the old Julfar to gradually decay until its ruins became forgotten amongst the coastal sand dunes. Today most of Julfar in all likelihood remains still hidden beneath the sprawling dunes north of Ras al-Khaimah.” – courtesy David Millar

By: April Holloway

Comments

I want to become in Anthropologist in Ancient and Lost Civilizations, so please update me thanks :)

I’m very disappointed in this article. It is nothing more than an abbreviated version of other articles on AO. The author merely cut and pasted portions of the articles into this one with no new information offered. She even copied the pictures and only the last portion credited the original author. Isn’t  that plagiarism?

I want to become in Anthropologist in Ancient and Lost Civilizations, so please update me thanks :)

Has anyone ever considered that if a city can not be found maybe it is some where else? In the case of Aztlan, theses creatures could have migrated from a very long way off, possibly North America. Also, they could have existed an extremely long time ago.

The stories I've come across about Azltan indicate that these people may have lived along the coast of the Zuni Sea in the American Southwest some 66 million years ago. There is evidence for civilization this long ago but mainline science refuses to study it.

See my black2tell bolg for more of my research. Mr. Black

Native's picture

There is a sunken Island beneath the Earth northern hemisphere, in the Under- or Neatherworld.

This Island is not sunken, but it is floating up in the Sky. This Island is the Milky Way which mythically is mentioned The Heavenly River. From its center was our Solar System once created and the solar System floats on one of the several rivers going from the galactic center.

There are lots of mythical places all over the world and often they are a part of a local Story of Creation. Read more here – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mythological_places

My Mytho-Cosmological site – http://www.native-science.net/index.html 

       

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