Pagan God Caught in River by Fisherman Confirmed as Being up to 4,200 Years-old and Unique

Pagan God Caught in River by Fisherman Confirmed as Being up to 4,200 Years-old and Unique

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By The Siberian Times reporter

Likely from the Okunev culture, might this mysterious ancient figurine with the angry face be a children's 'rattle', to ward off evil spirits?

The 'very distinctive expression of ferocity and rage' has never been seen before among ancient Siberian statuettes, say experts.

Fisherman Nikolay Tarasov, 55, made the remarkable Bronze Age 'catch' when he dipped his net in the Dudet River near his home in Tisul, Kemerovo region, on a fishing expedition for tench and carp.

Instead of a fish, he netted a strangely shaped stone - a fossilized figurine - the catch of a lifetime. 'I was about to throw it back in the water - but at the last second I looked at it more closely,' he said.

'And I saw a face. I stopped and washed the thing in the river - and realized it wasn't a stone of an unusual shape, as I thought earlier - but a statuette.'

It has almond shaped eyes, a large mouth with full lips, and a ferocious facial expression.

Fisherman Nikolay Tarasov, 55, made the remarkable Bronze Age 'catch' when he dipped his net in the Dudet River near his home in Tisul, Kemerovo region. Pictures: Tisul History museum, The Siberian TimesFisherman Nikolay Tarasov, 55, made the remarkable Bronze Age 'catch' when he dipped his net in the Dudet River near his home in Tisul, Kemerovo region. Pictures: Tisul History museum, The Siberian TimesFisherman Nikolay Tarasov, 55, made the remarkable Bronze Age 'catch' when he dipped his net in the Dudet River near his home in Tisul, Kemerovo region. Pictures: Tisul History museum, The Siberian Times

Fisherman Nikolay Tarasov, 55, made the remarkable Bronze Age 'catch' when he dipped his net in the Dudet River near his home in Tisul, Kemerovo region. Pictures: Tisul History museum, The Siberian Times

'On the reverse side on the head the carver had etched plaited hair with wave like lines. Below the plait there are lines looking like fish scales,' he said. 'I went to the local museum - and experts there quite literally jumped for joy, and quite high.'

Speaking exclusively to The Siberian Times, Dr. Pavel German, researcher at the Institute of Human Ecology, Kemerovo, who investigated the 2014 find with colleague Professor Vladimir Bobrov, said: 'We can say that this figurine is unique, as nothing identical has been found so far.

'It is interesting that the face depicted on this figurine has a very distinctive expression of ferocity and rage. Usually the ancient - Neolithic and Bronze Age - anthropomorphic sculptures do not have any distinctive expression.

'This is the other reason, why the figurine is unique. We argue that is was a god or a spirit.'

'It is interesting that the face depicted on this figurine has a very distinctive expression of ferocity and rage.' Pictures: Pavel German and Vladimir Bobrov, Tisul History museum'It is interesting that the face depicted on this figurine has a very distinctive expression of ferocity and rage.' Pictures: Pavel German and Vladimir Bobrov, Tisul History museum

'It is interesting that the face depicted on this figurine has a very distinctive expression of ferocity and rage.' Pictures: Pavel German and Vladimir Bobrov, Tisul History museum

The experts believe the figurine is from the ancient Okunev culture 'judging by the style'. But recent discoveries at an Okunev site some 300 kilometers’ northwest have led to a new theory about this river find.

Eight horn figurines were found at Lake Itkol in Khakassia which have been described as akin to modern-day children's rattles but with the purpose of fending off evil spirits. They were discovered in the grave of a baby less than a year old at death.

While far from identical, they are said to be stylistically similar to the fisherman's pagan god, which is now on display at Tisul History Museum.

'Our figurine shows a resemblance to those found in child burials at Itkol Lake,' said Dr. German. 'When we undertook our research we did not know about the Itkol figurines. Yet while there is a resemblance between them, they are not completely similar.'

For now, it remains a mystery how the ferocious find came to be in the river.

Eight horn figurines were found at Lake Itkol in Khakassia some 300 kilometres northwest have led to a new theory about this river find. Pictures: Andrey Polyakov & Yuri Esin, The Siberian TimesEight horn figurines were found at Lake Itkol in Khakassia some 300 kilometres northwest have led to a new theory about this river find. Pictures: Andrey Polyakov & Yuri Esin, The Siberian Times

Eight horn figurines were found at Lake Itkol in Khakassia some 300 kilometres northwest have led to a new theory about this river find. Pictures: Andrey Polyakov & Yuri Esin, The Siberian Times

'The find could have gotten into the water due to different circumstances, among them - the destruction of an ancient child's burial,' said Dr. German. 'The figurine was found in a local river, and we went to the site, hoping there would be more (archeological items), but sadly we had no luck.'

He added: 'It is hard to tie this figurine to specific Okunev settlements or burials. The closest known settlement from the Okunev culture is located (underwater) in the modern Tambarskoye Reservoir, 10 kilometers from where the figurine was found.'

The find was made upstream of this submerged archeological site. The figurine is made of antler and 'lines on its head depict the hairs. And on the back there is an ornament which resembles scale. We suppose that it depicts a cape or mantle made of scale.'

Comments

Ancient carvings and figures from Siberia have broad similarities to carvings by Northwest Coast Native Americans and First Peoples and Yupik and Inuit peoples in North America. Common traits include an interest in animal forms and their stylization and even in apparent totems. What is so interesting is the commonality of motifs and forms of art from such diverse and widespread regions as Siberia, Shang and Chou China, and Salish carving in Washington State. The similarities in the art of these various regions and time periods, sometimes very striking, suggest that a broadly based animist movement in art starting from deep in antiquity (some notable finds in Siberia date from 11,000 BP) among tribal peoples in East Asia has survived until the present day essentially unchanged, and that the arts of these various peoples may reveal one day a common and dramatic single prehistoric origin either geographically or more importantly, conceptually and as an aspect of general culture and belief thousands or even tens of thousands of years BC.

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