Preserved Megalapteryx (moa) foot, Natural History Museum.

The Frightening Discovery of the Mount Owen Claw

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By April Holloway  | The Epoch Times

Nearly three decades ago, a team of archaeologists were carrying out an expedition inside a large cave system on Mount Owen in New Zealand when they stumbled across a frightening and unusual object. With little visibility in the dark cave, they wondered whether their eyes were deceiving them, as they could not fathom what lay before them—an enormous, dinosaur-like claw still intact with flesh and scaly skin. The claw was so well-preserved that it appeared to have come from something that had only died very recently.

The archaeological team eagerly retrieved the claw and took it for analysis. The results were astounding; the mysterious claw was found to be the 3,300-year-old mummified remains of an upland moa, a large prehistoric bird that had disappeared from existence centuries earlier.

The upland moa (Megalapteryx didinus) was a species of moa bird endemic to New Zealand. A DNA analysis published in the  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences  suggested that the first moa appeared around 18.5 million years ago and there were at least ten species, but they were wiped from existence “in the most rapid, human-facilitated megafauna extinction documented to date.”

With some sub-species of moa reaching over 10 feet (3 meters) in height, the moa was once the largest species of bird on the planet. However, the upland moa, one of the smallest of the moa species, stood at no more than 4.2 feet (1.3 meters). It had feathers covering its whole body, except the beak and soles of its feet, and it had no wings or tail. As its name implies, the upland moa lived in the higher, cooler parts of the country.

Left: Illustration of a Moa. Right: Preserved footprint of a Moa

Left: Illustration of a Moa. Right: Preserved footprint of a Moa (Wikimedia Commons)

The Discovery of the Moa

The first discovery of the moa occurred in 1839 when John W. Harris, a flax trader and natural history enthusiast, was given an unusual fossilized bone by a member of an indigenous Māori tribe, who said he had found it in a river bank. The bone was sent to Sir Richard Owen, who was working at the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons in London. Owen was puzzled by the bone for four years—it did not fit with any other bone he had come across.

Eventually, Owen came to the conclusion that the bone belonged to a completely unknown giant bird. The scientific community ridiculed Owen’s theory, but he was later proved correct with the discoveries of numerous bone specimens, which allowed for the complete reconstruction of a moa skeleton.

Sir Richard Owen standing next to a moa skeleton and holding the first bone fragment belonging to a moa ever found.
Sir Richard Owen standing next to a moa skeleton and holding the first bone fragment belonging to a moa ever found. ( Wikimedia Common )

Since the first discovery of moa bones, thousands more have been found, along with some remarkable mummified remains, such as the frightening-looking Mount Owen claw. Some of these samples still exhibit soft tissue with muscle, skin, and even feathers. Most of the fossilized remains have been found in dunes, swamps, and caves, where birds may have entered to nest or to escape bad weather, preserved through desiccation when the bird died in a naturally dry site (for example, a cave with a constant dry breeze blowing through it).

Mummified head of an upland moa

Mummified head of an upland moa ( Wikimedia Commons )

The Rise and Fall of the Moa

When Polynesians first migrated to New Zealand in the middle of the 13th century, the moa population was flourishing. They were the dominant herbivores in New Zealand’s forest, shrubland, and subalpine ecosystems for thousands of years, and had only one predator—the Haast’s eagle. However, when the first humans arrived in New Zealand, the moa rapidly became endangered due to over-hunting and habitat destruction.  

“As they reached maturity so slowly, [they] would not have been able to reproduce quickly enough to maintain their populations, leaving them vulnerable to extinction,” writes the  Natural History Museum , London. “All moas were extinct by the time Europeans arrived in New Zealand in the 1760s.” The Haast’s Eagle, which relied on the moa for food, died out soon after.

Giant Haasts eagle attacking New Zealand moa

Giant Haasts eagle attacking New Zealand moa ( Wikimedia Commons )

Revival of the Moa?

The moa has frequently been mentioned as a candidate for revival through cloning since numerous well-preserved remains exist from which DNA could be extracted. Furthermore, since it only became extinct several centuries ago, many of the plants that made up the moa’s food supply would still be in existence. 

Japanese geneticist Ankoh Yasuyuki Shirota has already  carried out preliminary work  toward these ends by extracting DNA from moa remains, which he plans to introduce into chicken embryos. Interest in the ancient bird’s resurrection gained further support in the middle of this year when Trevor Mallard, a Member of Parliament in New Zealand, suggested that reviving the moa over the next 50 years was a viable idea.

Comments

The claw in the picture looks REALLY fake. The scales look molded-on and the little holes look like latex or something. Why would the claws themselves have those little rot-holes? Too hard. Claws are of a material that wouldn't get little pinholes from sitting in the dirt.

Is that your new science "looks fake"?
Carbon date of 3300 years is credible not the millions of nonsense years.

Carbon dating is erroneous and completely misleading. It's the reason why scientists believe most of the hoaxes they unconsciously perpetrate. Carbon dating determines that coal has to be millions of years in the making, while failing to explain why objects of relatively recent manufacture are found in the mines.

I wish that carbon dating could be done away with. Perhaps then, scientists would have to think instead of trusting an unproven method for speculation and false analysis.

I think you are a bit confused, they don't use carbon dating for things in the millions of years. And besides its not like science just uses one method, AMS for example. For older samples they use other methods. Science uses a combination of methods for a accurate time frame.
Or we can use your suggestion and just think and not waste our time with pesky evidence, "I think there for it is" would be far better.

Defiant, If you'd read up on the subject of rot & the conditions it happens under, you'd understand that even in a ' cave that might have a dry & cool breeze blowing through it' , that there is some dessication of the softer tissues, but there'll always be some bacterial activity that will seek the easiest way out, & that'd be through the same, soft tissues; hence 'the little holes'. 'Looks Fake' ? Haven't you ever found a dead rodent, or even a lizard somewhere, as in the crawl space under a house & observed the dried body, some hair missing, & little holes? Maybe study the documentation on the Iceman's body found in the Alps a few years ago. Even in the severe cold, there was dessication, little holes here & there, & other signs of rot, or decomposition. Besides, I didn't get into this site to check on 'Fakes'. One can always double check a story by back tracking for another story with more, or less facts. Don't be so 'Defiant', look for info elsewhere, if the stuff at hand doesn't suit ya, it's out there (somewhere!) on this darned gadget!

Claws are just keratin - why wouldn't they show evidence of decomposition? Besides that it says other mummified specimens have been found and it could easily be proved a hoax with new DNA technology.

It's a giant and well preserved because it only died recently and it's from the Hollow Earth.

Maybe the wing bones were so small they weren't preserved. To my knowledge there has never been a totally wingless bird.

yes ima eat it

Moa is myth. These were Skeksis!

I'd like to think that as well, but they merged back with the urRu and dead Skeksis crumble to dust instantly, so.... no cigar I'm afraid.

Can anyone blame the new Zealanders for killing this son of a bitch? This is a good example of why the conquer modus existed during these times both with human and animal kind ; it was kill or be killed !

Really? We, in the modern age, can't second guess what actually happened back then, but, examples of of over-hunting exist with discoveries of remains of Mammoths & the hunting parties that killed them-all over the Earth. It wasn't 'Kill, Or Be Killed', it was a ready supply of meat, a butcher shop on its feet. The mammoth was slow & could be caught in a pit, or surrounded. The Moa, prob'ly was also. Ostriches are rounded up using barricades,moved by hunters into a closed-end corral. Read up & inform yourself.

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