Medieval miniature of Æthelflæd in Genealogical roll of the kings of England. 14th century

Æthelflæd: The Anglo-Saxon Iron Lady Who Showed the Vikings No Fear

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A Potent Widow

But Æthelflæd really came into her own following her husband’s death in 911, although it seems that he had been in poor health for the best part of the previous decade. The Mercian Register in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle , certainly celebrates her deeds from 910 onwards.

In 915, she successfully campaigned against the Welsh and the major Welsh kings, and in England she began further to expand her kingdom. In 917-8, her army took control of Viking-occupied Derby and Leicester, and just before her death, the “people of York” – that is, the Scandinavian lords of southern Northumbria – also agreed to submit to her.

Æthelflæd

Æthelflæd. ( Public Domain )

For a brief moment, she had authority not just over her own territory in Mercia, but over the Welsh, the Scandinavian East Midlands and possibly part of Northumbria, making her perhaps one of the three most important rulers in mainland Britain – the others being her brother Edward king of the Anglo-Saxons and Constantin II macAeda, King of the Scots.

This made her a major political actor in her own right, but also a respected and feared figure. Even more remarkably, she passed her authority on to her daughter, Ælfwynn, who was around 30 when her mother died. The rule of Ælfwynn in Mercia, which attracts virtually no comment at all from historians, lasted about six months before her uncle Edward launched a coup d’état, deprived her of all authority and took her into Wessex.

Æthelflæd’s legacy is enigmatic, wrapped up in the “making of England”. But she was a ruler of consequence in an era defined by male authority. Indeed, her project to rebuild the kingdom of Mercia and the Mercians might have placed midland England at the heart of later history.

Top Image: Medieval miniature of Æthelflæd in Genealogical roll of the kings of England. 14th century ( Public Domain ) What Aethelflad may have looked like. (History's HEROES? )

The article, originally titled ‘ Æthelflæd: The Anglo-Saxon Iron Lady ’ by Philip Morgan , Andrew Sargent , Charles Insley and Morn Capper was originally published on The Conversation and has been republished under a Creative Commons license.

Comments

Cousin_Jack's picture

The relationship between Wessex and Cornwall is what interests me, One person says the West Saxons conquered Cornwall, another says they didn’t. Then the Cornish sided with the Vikings to battle the West Saxons. Another story says that after Cornwall was conquered it was still allowed to experience a degree of independance. It interests me but I can’t understand why it doesn’t interest anyone else.

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