Advertising Policy

We at Ancient-Origins want to bring you, our valued online community, openness and transparency regarding advertisements on our site. We look to responsibly disclose the use of advertisements, along with their role and purpose.

Our aim is to bring you a fresh perspective on topics while presenting ancient history and modern discoveries in a very accessible way.

Partnerships with companies who serve online advertisements along our sidebar currently allow us to do that. It ensures we can continue to spread our message and achieve our goals to bring you fascinating and intelligent content, and make a difference both online and in the world around us.

Funds from advertising go towards:

  • Maintaining servers and infrastructure upkeep
  • Web expenses, hosting, bandwidth, software, administration
  • Researching and writing quality, original content articles
  • Cultivating a professional and knowledgeable editorial staff
  • Promotion and marketing
  • Charitable projects

This ad doesn’t interest me…

Finding relevant advertisers for our audience has proven difficult. We are working to improve ad quality and we hope to achieve this in the near future.

Please note that we do not necessarily endorse or support any products or services that are offered through the advertisements on our website.

Our Commitment

We are committed to a clear path in terms of advertisements on the site. This includes:

  • Disclosure about our use of online advertisements
  • Clear marking of advertising to allow our audience to make informed choices
  • Responsible use of the funds raised from online advertising

Please contact us if you have any questions or comments regarding our use of online advertisements. We’d love to hear from you! Feel free to send us your comments, articles or any technical issues.

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The Last of the Siberian Unicorns: What Happened to the Mammoth-Sized One-Horned Beasts of Legend?
Elasmotherium, also known as the Giant Rhinoceros or the Giant Siberian Unicorn, is an extinct species of rhino that lived in the Eurasian area in the Late Pliocene and Pleistocene eras. They have been documented from 2.6 million years ago, but the most recent fossils come from around 29,000 years ago.

Myths & Legends

The Last of the Siberian Unicorns: What Happened to the Mammoth-Sized One-Horned Beasts of Legend?
Elasmotherium, also known as the Giant Rhinoceros or the Giant Siberian Unicorn, is an extinct species of rhino that lived in the Eurasian area in the Late Pliocene and Pleistocene eras. They have been documented from 2.6 million years ago, but the most recent fossils come from around 29,000 years ago.

Our Mission

At Ancient Origins, we believe that one of the most important fields of knowledge we can pursue as human beings is our beginnings. And while some people may seem content with the story as it stands, our view is that there exists countless mysteries, scientific anomalies and surprising artifacts that have yet to be discovered and explained.

The goal of Ancient Origins is to highlight recent archaeological discoveries, peer-reviewed academic research and evidence, as well as offering alternative viewpoints and explanations of science, archaeology, mythology, religion and history around the globe.

We’re the only Pop Archaeology site combining scientific research with out-of-the-box perspectives.

By bringing together top experts and authors, this archaeology website explores lost civilizations, examines sacred writings, tours ancient places, investigates ancient discoveries and questions mysterious happenings. Our open community is dedicated to digging into the origins of our species on planet earth, and question wherever the discoveries might take us. We seek to retell the story of our beginnings. 

Ancient Image Galleries

View from the Castle Gate (Burgtor). (Public Domain)
Door surrounded by roots of Tetrameles nudiflora in the Khmer temple of Ta Phrom, Angkor temple complex, located today in Cambodia. (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Cable car in the Xihai (West Sea) Grand Canyon (CC BY-SA 4.0)