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papua new guinea

Scene of cannibalism based on European accounts of expeditions to the Americas from America tertia pars by Theodor de Bry, circa 1592. Source: Public domain

8 Ancient Cultures Practicing Cannibalism Through the Ages

When we think of cannibalism today it usually conjures up images of characters like Hannibal Lecter. In reality, many cultures practiced cannibalism throughout history. Therefore, while it may be a...
Malangan carvings, now world-famous, are the wooden carvings which are created for use in malangan ceremonies. Traditionally these were burnt at the conclusion of the event; in modern times most are now retained.      Source: Rita Willaert/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Honoring and Negating the Dead through Malangan in Papua New Guinea

The term “malangan” has a dual meaning. It can either represent the elaborate memorial festivals held in New Ireland (Papua New Guinea) in honor of deceased members of a clan, or it can refer to the...
Sculpting The Geological, Archaeological And Cultural Landscape Of Papua New Guinea

Sculpting The Geological, Archaeological And Cultural Landscape Of Papua New Guinea

The sculpturing of the geography of Papua New Guinea did not end with the eruption of the volcanos. In their wake basins and valleys formed, where people settled, thousands of years ago. A large...
Men of the Asmat tribe are floating in a canoe on the river. Amanamkay. Village, Asmat province, Indonesia (gudkovandrey/ Adobe Stock)

Papua New Guinea’s Sepik River Rituals

Winding its way like a serpentine from its origin source in the Victor Emanuel Mountain Range in the central highlands of Papua New Guinea, the Sepik River receives many tributaries along its way...
Modern day lakatoi at the Hiri Moale Festival, a modern celebration of the previous Hiri trade cycle. (Steve Jurvetson / CC BY-SA 2.0)

Oceania’s Papua New Guinea: Forged In Volcanic Fire

The Australasian realm in the Pacific Ocean includes Australia, New Zealand, eastern Indonesia, and several Pacific island groups - including Papua New Guinea – all scattered along the Ring of Fire,...
Genetic Evidence Suggests a Denisovan Presence in the Pacific Islands

Genetic Evidence Suggests a Denisovan Presence in the Pacific Islands

A new genetic study has provided important data to evolutionary scientists seeking to trace the migratory movements and cultural interactions of the people who settled the South Pacific islands of...
A domesticated New Guinea singing dog, singing.     Source: R.G. Daniel / CC BY 2.0

Singing Dogs Study May Tell Us More About Human Vocalization

A new study of a rare, unique breed of domesticated dog , originally from Papua New Guinea and believed to be extinct decades ago, has found that they still exist in the wild. The domesticated...
Man walking in a sea cave at sunset, illustration painting. New research on the Denisovans provides more insight on their lives and population spread.

A Trove of New Denisovan Discoveries Revealed At A Recent Anthropological Conference

The annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists held at the end of March in Cleveland, Ohio, was eagerly awaited by those with an interest in human origins as it would be...
A Fore tribesman of Papua New Guinea holding a skull

Diet of human brains helped Papua New Guinea tribe to resist disease

The investigation of a Papua New Guinea tribe, formerly infamous for eating human brains as part of their elaborate funerary rights, has provided insights into the development of mad cow disease and...
Main: A giant wave (public domain) Inset: This is the skull of a person who lived in what's now Papua New Guinea, 6,000 years ago.

6,000-Year-Old Skull is Earliest Known Victim of a Tsunami

Tsunamis spell calamity. These giant waves, caused by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and underwater landslides, are some of the deadliest natural disasters known; the 2004 tsunami in the Indian...
Evidence of Unknown Extinct Human Relative Found in DNA Study of Melanesians

Evidence of Unknown Extinct Human Relative Found in DNA Study of Melanesians

Traces of long-lost human cousins may be hiding in modern people’s DNA, a new computer analysis suggests. People from Melanesia, a region in the South Pacific encompassing Papua New Guinea and...
Papua New Guinea phallus artefacts

6,000-year-old carved phallus artefacts found in Papua New Guinea

Archaeologists in Papua New Guinea have made a rare discovery – six ceremonial tools carved out of volcanic black glass , which date back around 6,000 years. However more significantly, the artefacts...