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24,000-Year-Old Butchered Bones Found in Canada Change Known History of North America

24,000-Year-Old Butchered Bones Found in Canada Change Known History of North America

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Archaeologists have found a set of butchered bones dating back 24,000 years in Bluefish Caves, Yukon, Canada, which are the oldest signs of human habitation ever discovered in North America. Until recently, it was believed that the culture that represented the continent’s first inhabitants was the Clovis culture. However, the discovery of the butchered bones challenges that theory, providing evidence that human occupation preceded the arrival of the Clovis people by as much as 10,000 years.

For decades, it has been believed that the first Americans crossed the Bering Strait from Siberia about 14,000 years ago and quickly colonized North America. Artifacts from these ancient settlers, who have been named the Clovis culture after one of the archaeological sites in Clovis, New Mexico, have been found from Canada to the edges of North America.

A hallmark of the toolkit associated with the Clovis culture is the distinctively shaped, fluted stone spear point, known as the Clovis point. These Clovis points were from the Rummells-Maske Cache Site, Iowa

A hallmark of the toolkit associated with the Clovis culture is the distinctively shaped, fluted stone spear point, known as the Clovis point. These Clovis points were from the Rummells-Maske Cache Site, Iowa ( public domain ).

However, the recent discovery of bones in Canada that show distinctive cut marks supports the perspective that there were other inhabitants of America that preceded the Clovis.

The finding was made in the Bluefish Caves in Yukon, which consists of three small caves that are now considered to hold the oldest archaeological evidence in North America.  Researchers have found the bones of mammoths, horses, bison, caribou, wolves, foxes, antelope, bear, lion, birds and fish, many of which exhibit butchering marks made by stone tools.

Cut marks in the jaw bone of a now-extinct Yukon horse serve as evidence that humans occupied the Bluefish Caves in Yukon, Canada, up to 24,000 years ago. Photo by Bourgeon et al

Cut marks in the jaw bone of a now-extinct Yukon horse serve as evidence that humans occupied the Bluefish Caves in Yukon, Canada, up to 24,000 years ago. Photo by Bourgeon et al.

The site was first excavated by archaeologist Jacques Cinq-Mars between 1977–87, and initial dating suggested an age of 25,000 before present.  This was dismissed at the time as it did not fit with the well-established Clovis-First theory. However, a new study published in the journal PLOS One supports the initial dating, demonstrating that humans occupied the site as early as 24,000 years ago.

As part of the study, the research team analysed 36,000 mammal bones found in the caves. Carnivore tooth marks were observed on 38 to 56% of the bone material. A total of fifteen bone samples with cultural modifications confidently attributable to human activities were identified, while twenty more samples with “probable” cultural modifications were also found. “The traces identified on these bones are clearly not the result of climato-edaphic factors or carnivore activity,” the researchers report. “The presence of multiple, straight and parallel marks with internal microstriations observed on both specimens eliminates carnivores as potential agents.”

Bone sample from Bluefish cave showing cut marks made by humans.

Bone sample from Bluefish cave showing cut marks made by humans.

The findings support the hypothesis that prior to populating the Americas, the ancestors of Native Americans spent considerable time isolated in a Beringian refuge during the Last Glacial Maximum [LGM], the last period in the Earth's climate history during the last glacial period when ice sheets were at their greatest extension. As the researchers of the study concluded:

“In addition to proving that Bluefish Caves is the oldest known archaeological site in North America, the results offer archaeological support for the “Beringian standstill hypothesis”, which proposes that a genetically isolated human population persisted in Beringia during the LGM and dispersed from there to North and South America during the post-LGM period.”

Top image: Main: Kluane National Park, Yukon ( CC by SA 3.0 ) Inset: Cut marks in the jaw bone of a now-extinct Yukon horse serve as evidence that humans occupied the Bluefish Caves in Yukon, Canada, up to 24,000 years ago. Photo by Bourgeon et al.

By April Holloway

Comments

Roberto Peron's picture

The theory is that 40 mya new world monkeys (South America) split from old world monkeys (Africa) with the new world monkeys migrating into what is now South America.  It is postulated that these new world monkeys rafted on vegetation or crossed a landbridge.  Some theorists believe they rafted to North America first and then spread from there, however, there is no evidence for this. There may have been a landbridge or a series of islands across the Atlantic now covered by higher ocean levels.  These islands could have acted as “stepping stones.”  At present this is the favored theory.  Further, the Atlantic we see today between South America and Africa was not as wide during the time of these migrations it is theorized.  

Sorry about that Sir, I missed this. In your field of expertise you would know more about this than I. But I guess it would depend on what stage of evolution it might have happened. As an earlier Primate by accident? or at a later stage in evolution with intent looking for less competitive hunting grounds? 

Roberto Peron's picture

(said with tongue in cheek)…..Question is did these Old World primates raft to the New World with intent or by accident?   :)

 

They even think the New World Primates arrived to the Americas by Sea 40 million years ago, Why not early man? Or a Primate that was to become man?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oceanic_dispersal

There is plenty of Protein in the Sea and along the edges of both Polar Ice caps, no need for dependence on land at all. Even the Capuchin Monkey is known to eat Shellfish!

"because Australians LOOK LIKE Africans they must be the same! Nothing could be further from the truth!"
Not hung up on color at all. Simple observation. From Photographs I have seen very dark Brown Africans but full blooded Aborigines that were more truly Black. How they got from Africa to there is subject to conjecture unless it has been proven they traveled by land mostly and the last part by H2O. Perhaps the Aborigines remained truly original stock but the African races were somewhat diluted by lighter skinned races? As for Native Americans I've seen a lot of pictures and never seen one that seemed to be at all dark skinned flat nosed black stock at all. How do you explain the difference between the Eastern American Indians and the majority of northern and western groups?

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