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Nemrut Mountain at 2150 meters with colossal statues, and stone heads. A UNESCO World Heritage site. Anatolia, modern day Turkey. 	Source: Bulent/Adobe Stock

Ancient Anatolia: Cradle of Civilizations (Video)

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Ancient Anatolia: Cradle of Civilizations (Video)

Ancient Anatolia stands as a rich tapestry of human civilization, with its history weaving together a myriad of cultures, empires, and innovations that have left an indelible mark on the world. From the Paleolithic Period to the Iron Age, the landscape that is now mostly Turkey has been shaped by the ebb and flow of numerous civilizations, each contributing to its vibrant mosaic of heritage.

Among these ancient peoples, the Hittites reigned supreme in Anatolian history. Renowned for their military might and diplomatic prowess, the Hittites established one of the earliest known peace treaties with Egypt, the Treaty of Kadesh, solidifying their status as a dominant force in the ancient Near East. Their capital, Hattusa, boasted impressive fortifications and architectural marvels, reflecting their advanced civilization.

Following the decline of the Hittites, Anatolia witnessed the rise of other formidable empires, such as the Lydians and Phrygians. The Lydians, situated in western Anatolia, thrived on trade and commerce, pioneering the use of coinage as a medium of exchange. Under the reign of King Croesus, Lydia reached its zenith, exerting influence over neighboring Greek city-states and accumulating vast wealth.

Concurrently, the Phrygians, known for their mythical connections and musical innovations, inhabited central Anatolia. King Midas, legendary for his golden touch, symbolizes the wealth and splendor of Phrygian civilization. Their involvement in the Trojan War, as allies of Troy, further solidified their place in Greek mythology and historical narratives.

Additionally, the Kingdom of Urartu, situated in eastern Anatolia, emerged as a formidable power, challenging the Assyrians and establishing a militaristic society known for its skilled warriors and impressive fortresses.

Top image: Nemrut Mountain at 2150 meters with colossal statues, and stone heads. A UNESCO World Heritage site. Anatolia, modern day Turkey.          Source: Bulent/Adobe Stock

By Robbie Mitchell

 

Comments

You are correctly using the term ancient Anatolia. Nevertheless, the video included in the article incorrectly speaks of ancient Turkey, since the ancestors of the Turks were installed in Anatolia during the 11th ce AD.   

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Robbie

I’m a graduate of History and Literature from The University of Manchester in England and a total history geek. Since a young age, I’ve been obsessed with history. The weirder the better. I spend my days working as a freelance... Read More

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