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Detail of the Abydos King list in Egyp

The Abydos King List is a trove of information, preserving the identities of 76 kings of ancient Egypt

Abydos is one of the oldest ancient Egyptian cities (3,100 – 332 BC), and is one of the most important archaeological sites in all of Egypt. Many ancient temples and tombs can be found there, offering a glimpse into ancient Egyptian history, the people who lived during those times, and the historical events that occurred. Abydos developed into a very important cult site in ancient Egypt, as eventually it became very desirable to be buried there. One of the most important sites in Abydos is the Temple of Seti I. Within this temple is a list of seventy-six Egyptian kings. This list has served as an important tool in piecing together ancient Egyptian history, and in identifying the rulers from that time.

Drawing of the cartouches in the Abydos King List.

Drawing of the cartouches in the Abydos King List. Wikipedia, CC

The list (sometimes referred to as the King Table) contains three rows of 38 cartouches. A cartouche is a type of oval border which indicates that the name within is the name of a king. This list gives the names of ancient Egyptian Kings in chronological order, and is the sole naming source of many of the kings from the Seventh and Eighth Dynasties. While the list is highly valuable due to the names it provides, it is not comprehensive, and highly favors the Memphite kings. Of the three rival kingdoms, Memphis, Thebes, and Herakleopolis, Memphite kings are highly favored in the list, none of the Herakleopolitan kings are included, and Theban kings were only included at a point after Memphis ceased to exist. Several Egyptian kings were omitted from the list, including Akhenaten (Amenhotep IV), Tutankhamun, Ay, Hatshepsut, and Meryneith. It is supposed these kings were considered illegitimate, and certainly in Hatshepsut’s case, there was an ancient attempt to scrub the records bare of her name and existence.

The names contained on the Abydos King list are numerous – 76 in all - including more commonly known ones such as: Khufu, Sneferu, Amenhotep, and Seti.

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Like many other lists detailing the history of a region as set by their leaders, the Abydos table is not a complete historical documentation, however, it does reflect the cultural situation at the time. Some scholars suggest the list, as set down by Seti I, was to represent the royal ancestors in a ritual, performed on their behalf. Seti I himself was not of royal lineage, and so to ensure his own legitimacy he may have constructed a grand temple worthy of the gods, and filled it with the names of legitimate ancestors. Despite his more common background, Seti was an important figure in Egyptian history. He strove to re-establish Egyptian sovereignty over Syria and the Levant in the aftermath of the disorder caused by Akhenaten’s religious reforms.

The temple itself is cited by many as the most impressive religious structure still standing in Egypt . It did much to reassure the people of Egypt that the old gods were not forbidden, and it symbolized a return to tradition.

The façade of the temple of Seti I in Abydos, Egypt.

The façade of the temple of Seti I in Abydos, Egypt. Wikimedia, CC

It was believed to be the place where Osiris was buried, and as such is an important cult center. The sprawling limestone temple contained two open courts, two hypostyle halls, seven shrines, a chapel, and many other chambers. There was also a submerged tomb-like Osireion at the back.

Tall and Imposing, highly decorated pillars line the Temple of Seti I, in Abydos, Egypt.

Tall and Imposing, highly decorated pillars line the Temple of Seti I, in Abydos, Egypt. Public Domain

The king list within the Temple of Seti in Abydos provides important information and insight into ancient Egyptian culture and history. Even with the omissions, the Abydos King list is invaluable in identifying tombs and naming Egyptian Kings whose names might have otherwise have been lost in the sands of time. 

Featured image: Detail of the Abydos King list in Egypt. Public Domain

Sources

Abydos Kings List – Ancient Egypt Online. Available from: http://www.ancientegyptonline.co.uk/abydoskl.html

List of Kings, Temple of Seti I, Abydos – 360 Cities. Available from: http://www.360cities.net/image/list-of-kings-temple-of-seti-1-abydos-egypt#-40.48,-25.78,90.0

Abydos King List – Phouka. Available from: http://www.phouka.com/tr/egypt/history/KLAbydos.html

The Royal Tradition in Upper Egypt from Menes to Sety I – Abrock. Available from: http://www.abrock.com/MudloffSite/Ancient_Egypt.html

By M R Reese

Comments

but not reconstruct the artefacts i hope

Peter Harrap's picture

Something bothers me, having just read about Hatshepsut being identified by a tooth.

I can put any tooth in a jar with a name on it, and then years later some bright spark will match the tooth with the skeletal remains of somebody, on the basis of DNA.

But the sense of unease in the absentees from the king’s list bothers me, for similar reasons, and then I got to thinking, and it occurred to me that we allegedly identify remains by DNA, and find criminals by DNA, and then convict them of crimes where the DNA is the sole evidence, as with the tooth.

How do we do this? Forensic scientists sample a suspect’s DNA. It can be a number of suspects.

These samples are compared with crime scene evidence and the closest match is it.

However, as here and with the tooth fairy story from the Hatshepsut article, the samples are only taken for comparison from very few people.

There are 6 billion + beings on earth right now. Out of them , if all were sampled in the same way, how many matches would there actually be? How many of us would be found impossibly guilty whilst the real criminal escaped?

Here this list sourced an entire book by Velikovski who rightly pointed out not merely missing kings, but chronological disparities.

Since these people are NOT in the list, the list itself, IF they existed, is invalid. Imagine the British list of reigning monarchs completely omitting Henry the Eigth and Queen Elizabeth the First, and ALL written records of them being completely destroyed. Or every record of Hitler and Nazism vanishing.

Isn’t it high time somebody asked a few pertinent questions, instead of putting it down to time and predjudices (our own)?

Hello everyone, The Mummy showing in the Cairo Museum is not that of Pharaoh HATSHEPSUT, why is it that such major Magazine as National Geographic, Discovery Channel and Time Magazine had publish such atrocity... and the Cairo Museum will not allow outside Scientist experts to do a full DNA on the body... It does make me angry.... That is the body of queen Ati from Punt... and about the list of Pharaoh's in the temple that they called Seti... well I can tell you that THUTMOSE I, was the one who started that temple and as always some Pharaoh's always want to take credit for some one else achievement's, the name of HATSHEPSUT was their... and in 2002, when I visited it shows that the wall was complete re done by Seti course the son of Thutmose III, who NOW IS BELIEVE THAT WAS NOT THE SON OF THUTMOSE II , BECAUSE THE DNA DOES NOT MATCH AND THE REAL BODY IN THEIR IS THAT OF THUTMOSE II.
NOW FOR HISTORY THUTMOSE III WAS A BASTARD, PROBABLY THE SON OF PUYEM-RE THE SECOND PROPHET OF AMUN... ISIS SPENDED TO MUCH TIME IN THE TEMPLE TALKING TO PUYEM-RE. AND THUTMOSE II WAS WARN THAT PROBABLY WHAT SHE WAS CARRYING INSIDE HER, WAS NOT! HIS, WHICH HATSHEPSUT WARN HIM.... THAT IS WHY THE THRONE OF EGYPT WAS NOT GIVING TO HIM.
I WISH THUTMOSE II WERE HERE AND SEE WHAT HE HAD TO SAY ABOUT THIS NOW, AND HIS PRECIOUS SNAKE ISIS!

HATSHEPSUT.

rbflooringinstall's picture

Something seems really shady about this whole thing.

Peace and Love,

Ricky.

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