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Ron Miller

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Ron Miller

RON MILLER is an illustrator and author living in South Boston, Virginia. Before becoming a freelance illustrator in 1977, Miller was art director for the National Air & Space Museum's Albert Einstein Planetarium. Prior to this he was a commercial advertising illustrator. His primary work today entails the writing and illustration of books specializing in astronomical, astronautical and science fiction subjects. His special interest is in exciting young people about science and in recent years has focussed on writing books for young adults. To date he has more than fifty titles to his credit. His work has also appeared on scores of book jackets, book interiors and in magazines such as National Geographic, Astronomy, Scientific American, Science et Vie, Air & Space, Sky & Telescope, Natural History, Discover, Geo, etc.

Miller's books include the Hugo-nominated The Grand Tour, Cycles of Fire, In the Stream of Stars, and The History of Earth. All of them have been Book-of-the-Month Club Feature Selections (as well as selections of the Science, Quality Paperback and Astronomy Book Clubs) and have seen numerous translations. They have received many commendations and awards as well. His "Worlds Beyond" series received the prestigious American Institute of Physics Award of Excellence, The Art of Chesley Bonestell, received a Hugo Award and the Astronomical Society of the Pacific has called The Grand Tour "a modern classic".

Considered an authority on Jules Verne, Miller translated and illustrated new, definitive editions of Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and Journey to the Center of the Earth as well as a major companion/atlas to Verne's works, Extraordinary Voyages. He has acted as a consultant on Verne for Disney Imagineering and A&E's Biography series. He designed a set of ten commemorative stamps for the U.S. Postal Service, one of which is attached to the New Horizons spacecraft that recently flew past Pluto. He has also been a production illustrator for motion pictures, notably Dune and Total Recall . He has also done preproduction concepts, consultation and matte art for David Lynch, George Miller, John Ellis, UFO Films and James Cameron. He designed and co-directed the computer-generated show ride film, Impact!. He has taken part in numerous international space art workshops and exhibitions, including seminal sessions held in Iceland and the Soviet Union (where he had been invited by the Soviet government to take part in the 30th anniversary celebration of the launch of Sputnik), and has lectured on space art and space history in the U.S., France, Japan, Italy and Great Britain. Miller has been on the faculty of the International Space   University. His original paintings are in numerous private and public collections, including the Smithsonian Institution and the Pushkin Museum (Moscow).

Miller has also written several novels, including a tetralogy of fantasy novels---Palaces and Prisons, Silk and Steel and Hearts and Armor and Mermaids & Meteors. The first of these won a Silver Award for best fiction from ForeWord magazine. Another novel, Bradamant, won the Violet Crown Award from the Writer's League of Texas. In addition to these, there is Velda, a hard-boiled detective novel, collection of short stories and comic book series. Miller is a contributing editor for Air & Space/Smithsonian magazine, a member of the International Academy of Astronautics, a Life Member and a Fellow and past Trustee of the International Association for the Astronomical Arts.

History

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Human Origins

Map of sites and postulated migratory pathways associated with modern humans dispersing across Asia during the Late Pleistocene.
Most people are now familiar with the traditional "Out of Africa" model: modern humans evolved in Africa and then dispersed across Asia and reached Australia in a single wave about 60,000 years ago. However, technological advances in DNA analysis and other fossil identification techniques, as well as an emphasis on multidisciplinary research

Ancient Technology

Detail of a star chart dating to the Middle Kingdom.
The calendar is one of mankind’s most important inventions. Calendars allowed societies to organize time for religious, social, economic, and administrative purposes. The calendar, or rather, two sets of calendars, were invented by the ancient Egyptians. One of these was a lunar calendar, which was used mainly for the organization of religious festivals.

Ancient Places

Smuts house
The farmstead of General Jan Smuts on the outskirts of Pretoria, is reputed to be one of the most haunted private homes in the country, according to Mr Mark Rose-Christie, raconteur and social scientist, who regularly takes brave visitors on a tour of haunted sites on his mystery ghost bus.

Our Mission

At Ancient Origins, we believe that one of the most important fields of knowledge we can pursue as human beings is our beginnings. And while some people may seem content with the story as it stands, our view is that there exists countless mysteries, scientific anomalies and surprising artifacts that have yet to be discovered and explained.

The goal of Ancient Origins is to highlight recent archaeological discoveries, peer-reviewed academic research and evidence, as well as offering alternative viewpoints and explanations of science, archaeology, mythology, religion and history around the globe.

We’re the only Pop Archaeology site combining scientific research with out-of-the-box perspectives.

By bringing together top experts and authors, this archaeology website explores lost civilizations, examines sacred writings, tours ancient places, investigates ancient discoveries and questions mysterious happenings. Our open community is dedicated to digging into the origins of our species on planet earth, and question wherever the discoveries might take us. We seek to retell the story of our beginnings. 

Ancient Image Galleries

View from the Castle Gate (Burgtor). (Public Domain)
Door surrounded by roots of Tetrameles nudiflora in the Khmer temple of Ta Phrom, Angkor temple complex, located today in Cambodia. (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Cable car in the Xihai (West Sea) Grand Canyon (CC BY-SA 4.0)