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Dr. Sophia Protopapa

Dr. Sophia Protopapa's picture
Dr. Sophia Protopapa

Sophia Protopapa is a Career Counselor and the Director of the Career Development Office at Hellenic American University, Nashua, NH, USA and Hellenic American College, Athens, Greece.

She holds a BA in History and an MA in Mediterranean Studies, an MA in Industrial/Organizational Psychology and a Doctorate in Social Sciences with emphasis on the role of the leader in transfer of training on the job. She is currently attending an MSc in Clinical Mental Health Counseling.

She is a certified Global Career Development Facilitator (GCDF), a REALISE2 Practitioner for the relevant strengths test, and holds an Advanced Diploma in Personal and Executive Coaching.

Since 2003, she has been a lecturer in undergraduate and postgraduate programs teaching Organizational Behavior, Human Resources Management, Business Ethics, Research Methods and Advanced Academic Writing. Also, she participates in European co-funded projects as a researcher and trainer in strengths based mentoring, personal development and employability skills.  

Combining her love for ancient History, Philosophy and Psychology, her research at present focuses on personal and leadership development examining eudaimonia, virtue ethics, character development, moral psychology and virtuous leadership. She has developed the ARETE© model of virtuous leadership based on ancient Greek and Roman ethics and modern leadership theories and she is currently writing a book on the topic. She runs workshops and gives lectures in schools, universities and organizations to promote virtuous leadership and good character.

Sophia is the co-author of the book Emotional Prosperity - Emotional Bankruptcy: An Inside-Out Approach , 2015, Plethora Editions, and the author of the book Eudaimonia as a way of life: A conversation with Aristotle inspired by the Nicomachean Ethics , 2016, Self-publication.

History

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Ancient Places

Caves of Loltun, Mexico
It goes on speak about the challenges and wonders of Columbus’s voyage to the new lands known today as the Caribbean. It even goes on to mention Columbus’s blunder in assuming that this newly discovered land was India when in fact it was what we know today as the Bahamas.

Opinion

Hopewell mounds from the Mound City Group in Ohio. Representative image
During the Early Woodland Period (1000—200 BC), the Adena people constructed extensive burial mounds and earthworks throughout the Ohio Valley in Ohio, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, and West Virginia. Many of the skeletal remains found in these mounds by early antiquarians and 20th-Century archaeologists were of powerfully-built individuals reaching between 6.5 and eight feet in height (198 cm – 244 cm).

Our Mission

At Ancient Origins, we believe that one of the most important fields of knowledge we can pursue as human beings is our beginnings. And while some people may seem content with the story as it stands, our view is that there exists countless mysteries, scientific anomalies and surprising artifacts that have yet to be discovered and explained.

The goal of Ancient Origins is to highlight recent archaeological discoveries, peer-reviewed academic research and evidence, as well as offering alternative viewpoints and explanations of science, archaeology, mythology, religion and history around the globe.

We’re the only Pop Archaeology site combining scientific research with out-of-the-box perspectives.

By bringing together top experts and authors, this archaeology website explores lost civilizations, examines sacred writings, tours ancient places, investigates ancient discoveries and questions mysterious happenings. Our open community is dedicated to digging into the origins of our species on planet earth, and question wherever the discoveries might take us. We seek to retell the story of our beginnings. 

Ancient Image Galleries

View from the Castle Gate (Burgtor). (Public Domain)
Door surrounded by roots of Tetrameles nudiflora in the Khmer temple of Ta Phrom, Angkor temple complex, located today in Cambodia. (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Cable car in the Xihai (West Sea) Grand Canyon (CC BY-SA 4.0)