The Tamam Shud Enigma

The Tamam Shud Enigma – Dead Body found in Australia with Ancient Persian Connection

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On December 1, 1948, authorities were called to Somerton beach in Adelaide, South Australia. A dead body had been found. Little did police realize they were about to encounter what is now considered one of Australia’s most profound mysteries, with connections to the ancient world.

They found his cold body on the sand, slumped at the base of a seawall. He was a middle-aged man in top physical condition, smartly dressed in a suit and tie, his sophisticated black shoes polished. Despite the hot weather, he wore a knit pullover and suit-jacket. His corpse revealed no obvious cause of death. Nobody knew who he was, or where he had come from. After collecting the body, police examined his possessions and clothes for a hint of who he was, but the tags and labels had been carefully removed, leaving no trail.

Unknown dead man found on Somerton Beach, Adelaide

Police photo of the unknown dead man found on Somerton Beach, Adelaide, on the morning of 1 December 1948. ( Public Domain )

Investigators were perplexed when they found what appeared to be a secret message stuffed in his trouser pocket. The words Tamam Shud were printed on a rolled-up scrap of paper, found deep in the unidentified man's pocket. Consulting library experts, police found that the mysterious scrap had been torn from the last page of a rare copy of The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. Eerily, Tamam Shud is a phrase meaning "the end" or "finished", and is found at the end of The Rubaiyat.

Tamam Shud

Image: Tamam Shud. The scrap of paper, with its distinctive font, found hidden in the dead man's trousers, torn from the last page of a rare New Zealand edition of The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam ( Public Domain )

Was this cryptic note a final message of doom for the unknown man?

The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam is a collection of poems, translated into English from Persian by Victorian writer Edward Fitzgerald in 1859. The quatrains were originally penned by Omar Khayyám, a Persian poet, astronomer, philosopher and mathematician from the 12 th century. Khayyám was one of the major polymaths of the medieval period, and was dubbed the “philosopher of the world”.

Portrait of Omar Khayyám, 12 th century Persian poet. Image source .

The theme of The Rubaiyat is one of Carpe diem , of seizing the day – living to the fullest and dying with no regrets. Smithsonian describes the poems as “romantic reflections on life and mortality.” Investigators suspected that the unknown man had thus committed suicide with some sort of poison, but they had no evidence to back up the theory. In fact, they had no evidence to show what had actually caused his death, although they assumed he died from a dose of undetectable poison. The South Australia coroner published his final results admitting he was unable to say who the Somertan Man was, or what had killed him.

As the investigation continued in 1949, a copy of The Rubaiyat was recovered bearing the tear-marks that matched the scrap found on the body. This very rare, first-edition book of ancient poems had been placed in the backseat of an unlocked car which had been parked along a jetty a week or two before the body had been found. The car owner turned the book in to police, but requested to remain anonymous, adding to the mysterious nature of the case.

Under close inspection, the rare copy revealed scrawled letters on the back cover, grouped together in no recognizable language. How strange, yet fitting, that a cryptograph would be found within a book of poems by a renowned ancient philosopher and mathematician. Detectives determined it was a secret code, and due to the tense times of the Cold War, speculated that Somerton Man was a Soviet spy murdered by unknown enemies. No governments or intelligence agencies have ever admitted knowing the man. The Rubaiyat code was made public and many tried to decipher it in vain, but it remains uncracked to this day.

Somerton Man Code

Somerton Man Code. The handwriting showing pencil markings in the back of a book of the Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám . The markings are presumed to be some sort of code. ( Public Domain )

The unknown man was buried without anyone ever learning the truth of his life or death.

The Tamam Shud case remains an unsolved enigma, but The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam seems to maintain a hold over life and death in Southern Australia. Several deaths are seen as possibly related to the Tamam Shud case. Could the ancient writings be cursed?

Comments

LOUIS MILLETTE's picture

unless they really want to keep mystery around that book we should know by now the name of the car owner that had the book return to police

so normaly police should have his name

if not it is a mysterious mystery,,,?

lizleafloor's picture

It IS a mystery! The man who turned in the book to police requested anonymity at the time, which certainly seems suspicious. In fact, many of the people investigated by police at the time remain unnamed to this day. Allegedly the anonymous man found the book in the car and assumed it belonged to his brother in law, but never gave it a thought until the police went public with a few details of the case - such as the ripped back page with "Tamam Shud". He reportedly realized he had the ripped copy and turned it in to investigators.

Why he would do that if he was involved in the death is unknown.

SOMEONE out there knows what happened, surely.

Only the man who turned the book in was suspicious? What about the guy who "saw the location" of the man and boy in a dream? Could he, perchance, be the same anonymous man who turned in the book he "found"? Mysterious, indeed.

Its Count St. Germain!

60 Minutes revealed that the Somerton Man was romantically linked to Somerton Park nurse Jessica Thomson who lived in Moseley St, just metres from where the man's body was found slumped against a sea wall 65 years ago.I also heard the book that was turned in had Jessica's unlisted phone number inside.

All police records relating to the case have been destroyed and Jessica, the one tangible link to his identity, is dead. Jessica also had a son, Robin, to another man. Robin's wife Roma Egan and their daughter, Rachel, have now come forward claiming Robin was the progeny of the Somerton Man and Jessica Thomson.They are backing a new bid by Adelaide University physicist and Somerton Man expert Professor Derek Abbott to exhume the Somerton Man's body from his West Terrace Cemetery grave.

Thank you.
I read 73 in a Velikovsky book earlier this week, but was not able to determine his reference and source....
Ah Love! could thou and I with Fate conspire
To grasp this sorry Scheme of Things entire
Would not we shatter it to bits-and then
Re-mould it nearer to the Heart's Desire!

As I enjoy some of the mustang grape wine I made on my birthday....
42 And lately, by the Tavern Door agape
Came stealing through the Dusk an Angel Shape
Bearing a Vessel on his shoulder; and
He bid me taste of it; and it 'twas - the Grape!

.....the ambrosia of the Gods, the bliss, the euphoria, the treasure, the grape portal.....the Aquarian age.

Thank you for bringing this poem to my attention.

Sound like a bit of pre-Cold war intrigue. Even then , physically fit middle aged men were not representative of the majority of his cohort.

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