The three faces of the Lake Winnipesaukee mystery stone, New Hampshire, USA

Out of Place Artifact: The Mysterious Stone Egg of Lake Winnipesaukee

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In 1872, construction workers digging a hole for a fence post near the shores of Lake Winnipesaukee in New England found a lump of clay, with an egg shaped artifact inside it, six feet below the ground. Called the ‘Mystery Stone’, it is one of New Hampshire's more curious and lesser known relics. Amateur and professional archaeologists have speculated about the origin of this strange artifact for well over one hundred years with no clear answers emerging.

The rock type is not familiar to New Hampshire and there are no other known objects bearing similar markings or design in the United States. It may very well have been the work of someone living in a faraway place and time, as nothing like its fine workmanship has been produced by the Native American tribes living locally in the area.

Panoramic view of Lake Winnipesaukee, New Hampshire

Panoramic view of Lake Winnipesaukee, New Hampshire ( Wikimedia Commons )

Description of the Mysterious Stone

The mystery stone egg is approximately 4 inches (10.2cms) long, 2 1/2 inches  (6.4cms) thick, weights eighteen ounces (510.3grams) and has a dark-hue to it. Hard as granite, it is about the size and shape of a goose egg. The stone is a type of quartzite, derived from sandstone, or mylonite, a fine-grained rock formed by the transference of rock layers along faults. There are holes bored in both ends of the stone and it was drilled through from end to end with different sized tools, and polished along its surface.

Beyond its strange construction and design, the stone is marked with bizarre carvings ranging from astronomical symbols to a human face along its smooth egg faced sides. On one side, there are what appears to be inverted arrows, a moon with some dots and a spiral.  Another side has an ear of corn with seventeen kernels in the row. Underneath, is a circle with three figures; one of which looks like a deer's leg along with some kind of animal with large ears. The “third” side shows a tepee with four poles, an oval and a human face.  The face is sunken with a nose that does not rise above the surface of the egg with lips that seem to give the image some kind of purposeful expression.

Details of carvings on two of the sides of the stone

Details of carvings on two of the sides of the stone ( Noahsage)

History of the Lake Winnipesaukee Stone Egg

It was Seneca A. Ladd, a local businessman, who hired the workers to dig the fence post that is credited with the discovery of this intriguing artifact. When it was first unveiled to the world, the American Naturalist journal described it as “a remarkable Indian relic.” Documents and newspaper articles show that by 1872 Seneca Ladd had the “egg” in his possession and by 1885, it was notable enough to be reported in the county history book. Ladd died in 1892, and in 1927, one of his daughters, Frances Ladd Coe of Center Harbor, donated the stone to the New Hampshire Historical Society in the state capital of Concord. There it was separated from the Native American 1800’s-era cultural artifacts and items of modern day interest.

Seneca A. Ladd.

Seneca A. Ladd. ( Cowhampshire)

Controversial Theories on the Origin of the Strange Egg

As for its purpose, there have been attempts made by historians over the years to come up with an explanation for the stone with no clear answer to date. 


Initial interpretations began with the simplest answer.  In November of 1872, The American Naturalist suggested that the stone "commemorates a treaty between two tribes.” However, this idea did not hold up long and it was later hypothesized that the stone was some kind of ancient tool. 

There have also been suggestions that the egg could be Celtic or Inuit in origin and in 1931 a letter was written to the New Hampshire Historical Society suggesting that it was a “thunderstone.” Also known as "thunderbolts" or "thunder axes," a thunderstone is a worked stone object, often wedge-shaped like an axe blade, that is alleged to have fallen from the sky. Stories of thunderstones are found in cultures all over the world, and are often associated with a thunder god. The writer went on to say that such objects " always present the appearance of having been machine or hand-worked: frequently they come from deep in the earth, embedded in lumps of clay, or even surrounded by solid rock or coral .”


i have the same strange egg but there is some liquid inside it.pls provide me ur email address so that i can attach the mystery pics and mail to you..i just wanted to know details about the pics what i have. and there is no any images articrafted on it

I would say it is a hoax. The art seems to have been created with tools. In addition, there is an odd amalgamation of symbols that make no sense to be placed together. Some fortune seeker probably created it in the 19th century and buried it to be "discovered" later.

Stone is impossible to date and so it makes the perfect object of a hoax.

Hey Mark! I would have to agree with you; it does look like a hoax. The incongruity of the high level of manufacture combined with what appear to be rather mundane symbols is what stands out to me. Deer, corn and teepees... Looks like the sort of symbols some 19th century wag would add on to a lathe turned stone egg.

I agree with your assessment of the stereotypical "Indian" symbols. The tipi itself is extremely odd. The "discovery location" is a LONG way from the plains, and I am certain it would not even be recognized in the Eastern U.S.

If the stone is not indigenous to the Eastern US, then where is the nearest location?


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