Carl A.P. Ruck

Prof. Carl Ruck

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Carl A.P. Ruck is Professor of Classics at Boston University, an authority on the ecstatic rituals of the god Dionysus. With the ethno-mycologist R. Gordon Wasson and Albert Hofmann, he identified the secret psychoactive ingredient in the visionary potion that was drunk by the initiates at the Eleusinian Mystery. In Persephone’s Quest: Entheogens and the Origins of Religion , he proclaimed the centrality of psychoactive sacraments at the very beginnings of religion, employing the neologism “entheogen” to free the topic from the pejorative connotations for words like drug or hallucinogen. His publications include:

The World of Classical Myth: Gods and Goddesses: Heroines and Heroes; The Apples of Apollo: Pagan and Christian Mysteries of the Eucharist; The Road to Eleusis: Unveiling the Secret of the Mysteries; Sacred Mushrooms of the Goddess: Secrets of Eleusis; The Hidden World: Survival of Pagan Shamanic Themes in European Fairytales; Mushrooms, Myth, and Mithras: The Drug Cult that Civilized Europe; The Effluents of Deity: Alchemy and Psychoactive Sacraments in Medieval and Renaissance Art; Entheogens, Myth and Human Consciousness; Intensive Latin: First Year and Review; Ancient Greek: Intensive Review and Reference ; IG II2 2323 The List of Victors in Comedy at the Dionysia; Pindar: Selected Odes: Dionysus in Thrace: Ancient Entheogenic Themes in the Mythology and Archaeology of Northern Greece, Bulgaria and Turkey; The Son Conceived in Drunkenness: Magical Plants in the World of the Greek Hero; The Great Gods of Samothrace and the Cult of the Little People.

Carl Ruck, Professor

Department of Classical Studies

School of Theology

754 Commonwealth Ave

Boston, Massachusetts 02215

USA

Contact: 1-617-353-4435 (office), 1-781-925-0182 (home)

bacchus@bu.edu

blaise131@verizon.net

Fax: 617-353-1611

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