Paul Devereux

Paul Devereux

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Paul Devereux BA, FRSA, is one of the pioneers of what used to be called ‘earth mysteries’, a field that later morphed into ‘ancient mysteries’ and other terminology, having worked in the subject area for over four decades, and was editor of  The Ley Hunter  magazine (1976-1996). 

His main areas of research interest and involvement include multi-perspective studies of ancient sacred places and landscapes, the exploration of sound at archaeological sites (‘archaeoacoustics’), unexplained aerial phenomena (which he terms ‘earth lights’), the use of altered mind states by ancient peoples (see his  The Long Trip ), along with general consciousness studies (including a major programme of dreamwork at ancient sites).  He has conducted his work at ancient places throughout the United Kingdom, as well as in Ireland, Scandinavia, across Continental Europe, Egypt, Mexico, Australia, and widely in North America. He lectures and gives workshops around the world, has written 27 books over nearly as many years along with hundreds of articles and academic papers, and has also broadcast widely on radio and TV, including originating two major documentaries for Channel 4 (UK)/National Geographic (Europe). He is Director of the Dragon Project Trust ( www.dragonprojecttust.org), archaeology columnist for  Fortean Times,  and the co-founding Managing Editor of the peer-reviewed  Time & Mind – The Journal of Archaeology, Consciousness and Culture . His contributions to  Ancient Origins  will draw on many aspects of all these research interests and involvements.

Paul’s website is: www.pauldevereux.co.uk

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At Ancient Origins, we believe that one of the most important fields of knowledge we can pursue as human beings is our beginnings. And while some people may seem content with the story as it stands, our view is that there exists countless mysteries, scientific anomalies and surprising artifacts that have yet to be discovered and explained.

The goal of Ancient Origins is to highlight recent archaeological discoveries, peer-reviewed academic research and evidence, as well as offering alternative viewpoints and explanations of science, archaeology, mythology, religion and history around the globe.

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By bringing together top experts and authors, this archaeology website explores lost civilizations, examines sacred writings, tours ancient places, investigates ancient discoveries and questions mysterious happenings. Our open community is dedicated to digging into the origins of our species on planet earth, and question wherever the discoveries might take us. We seek to retell the story of our beginnings. 

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