Detail of ‘Monk tasting wine’ by Josef Wagner-Höhenberg.
Monday, November 20, 2017 - 01:55

Each year the holidays bring with them an increase in both the consumption of alcohol and concern about drinking’s harmful effects. Alcohol abuse is no laughing matter, but is it sinful to drink and make merry, moderately and responsibly, during a holy season or at any other time?

3,000-year-old remains of a castle at the bottom of Lake Van in Turkey.
Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 22:58

Marine archaeologists made a superb find at the bottom of Turkey’s largest lake – a very well-preserved castle dating back 3,000 years. It was likely built by the mysterious Urartian civilization which inhabited the surrounds of Lake Van during the Iron Age.

A typical depiction of a pirate
Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 18:58

Olivier Levasseur (known also by his nicknames ‘La Buse’, meaning ‘the Buzzard’, or ‘La Bouche’, meaning ‘the Mouth’) was a French pirate who was active during the 1st half of the 18th century. Whilst Levasseur was a notorious and much-feared pirate during his days, his greatest legacy is the alleged treasure that he had hidden. Before his execution

: Ruins of the Haunted Eden Brown Estate Plantation Great House c. 1740 in 1993.
Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 13:54

There is something very alluring and ideal about places named Eden. The Garden of Eden – one of the first known references to Eden – is depicted in the Bible as a place free from sin. It was allegedly a comforting place, a paradise for the first man and woman known as Adam and Eve. Along with the unlimited peace and pleasure of this place, came a paradox however; one in which its inhabitants could enjoy this lifestyle forever, 

The remains of Mungo Man
Sunday, November 19, 2017 - 01:52

The remains of the first known Australian, Mungo Man, today begin their return to the Willandra area of New South Wales, where they were discovered in 1974. They’ll be accompanied by the remains of around 100 other Aboriginal people who lived in the Willandra landscape during the last ice age.

A skull found at Qumran. (Archaeology-of-Qumran/CC BY SA 3.0) Two scrolls from the Dead Sea Scrolls lie at their location in the Qumran Caves before being removed for scholarly examination by archaeologists.
Saturday, November 18, 2017 - 22:57

The discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls is regarded as one of the greatest archaeological finds in history. Almost as interesting as the content of the texts themselves has been the question of who created and cared for them. A recent analysis of skeletons found near the site and dating to the same time period suggests the common assumption of an enigmatic religious group known as the Essenes may be correct.

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Archaeology News on Human Origins, Ancient Places and Mysterious Phenomena

Artistic representations of the Paracas people

Ancient rock lines created by enigmatic Paracas culture predate Nazca geoglyphs

A new study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , has revealed the discovery of a complex set of geoglyphs constructed by the mysterious Paracas people of Peru...
New study - stonehenge

New study says humans have inhabited the Stonehenge landscape for ten millennia

A new archaeological dig in the Stonehenge environs has revealed that the area around the ancient stone circle is officially the longest continuously occupied settlement in Britain currently known...
Punic Vessels at shipwreck in Spain

2,300-year-old Punic Vessels uncovered in ancient shipwreck

A team of underwater archaeologists have discovered more than 150 Punic amphorae in the remains of an ancient shipwreck, known as the Binisafuller shipwreck, near the ancient port of Sanitja on the...
Cornish Monument

5,000-year-old Cornish monument to be restored to its former glory

The Carwynnen Quoit is an ancient dolmen which once sat in a field a few miles from the town of Camborne in Cornwall, in South West England. The 5,000-year-old structure collapsed in 1967 and plans...
Neanderthals Cooking Food

Neanderthals may have been the first to boil their food

A palaeontologist has claimed at a recent meeting of the Society for American Archaeology in Texas that Neanderthals cooked stews using skin bags or birch bark trays, according to a National...
The Mesolithic people of Doggerland - North Sea Islands

North Sea islands with prehistoric inhabitants were wiped out by tsunami

New research presented at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly in Vienna has revealed that an ancient civilisation located on a group of islands between Britain and Europe was wiped out by...
Artifacts - Valley of the Kings

Mysterious artifacts discovered buried in the Valley of the Kings

Archaeologists have discovered an unusual array of artifacts in four separate deposits in the Valley of the Kings, which they believe were buried as part of a ritual before the construction of a tomb...
Artifacts in Mexico

Unique artifacts uncovered in Mexico shed light on ancient civilisation

A team of archaeologists from Colorado State University have uncovered a rare copper and bronze rattle, as well as numerous human remains at a site in Angamuco, a pre-Hispanic city in the Mexican...
Tomb of Djehutihotep in Egypt - Wall Depiction

Researchers claim that key to Ancient Egyptian architectural brilliance is in wet sand

For centuries, people have theorized how the great pyramids of Egypt were built. The traditional perspective is that they were built through hauling massive stones across the sandy desert using just...
Neanderthals

New study suggests Neanderthals never went extinct

Scientific debate regarding the demise of the Neanderthals has been ongoing for decades with many experts proposing factors such as climate change, competition for resources, of lack of intelligence...
8,500-year-old footprints and graves in Istanbul

8,500-year-old footprints and graves are rewriting the history of Istanbul

The discovery of more than 1,500 footprints and a number of graves dating back 8,500 years has shed new light on the Istanbul’s history, which was previously thought to have begun less than three...
Tombs in the Valley of the Kings

More than 50 royal Egyptian mummies unearthed in Valley of the Kings

In a remarkable new discovery, archaeologists have uncovered a massive tomb in the West Bank of the Nile Valley of the Kings in Luxor containing more than 50 royal Egyptians, including four princes,...
Great Lakes Underwater Structures

9,000-year-old complex hunting structures found beneath the Great Lakes

A new study conducted by the University of Michigan has revealed a complex set of ancient hunting structures found under nearly 40 metres of water in Lake Huron, according to a report in Live Science...
Depiction of Jesus - Egypt

Egyptologists discover unusual structure with a possible early depiction of Jesus

A team of Catalan Egyptologists from the Catalan Egyptology Society and University of Barcelona claim to have found one of the earliest-known pictures of Jesus in a 6 th century tomb unearthed in...
Loch Ness

Buddhist Lama says Loch Ness monster is mythological water deity

The first Buddhist Lama in Britain, who is leading the project to create a new Buddhist centre in the Highlands of Scotland said the famous Loch Ness monster is a naga, a water deity which brings...
Treasure Vishnu Temple

Could newly discovered ancient stairs lead to more treasures under Vishnu Temple?

Archaeologists have unearthed a set of three ancient granite steps and building foundations near the northern entrance to the Sree Padmanabhaswamy Temple, located in Thiruvananthapuram, the capital...

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Ancient Places

El Caracol Observatory at Chichen Itza (Wright Reading/CC BY-NC 2.0) and Composite 3D laser scan image of El Caracol from above
In 1526, the Spanish conquistador Francisco de Montejo arrived on the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico and found most of the great Maya cities deeply eroded and unoccupied. Many generations removed from the master builders, engineers, and scientists who conceived and built the cities, the remaining Maya they encountered had degenerated into waring groups who practiced blood rituals and human sacrifice.

Opinion

Sculpture of a head from 950-1150 AD found at Building Y in the Tajin Chico section. On display at the Tajin site museum, Veracruz state, Mexico
El Tajin is a Mesoamerican archaeological site located in the North of the state of Veracruz, near the Gulf Coast of Mexico. The city, one of the most flourishing of the Classic and early Post-classic period, was only rediscovered in 1785, immediately capturing the imagination of European travelers with its imposing jungle-covered ruins and unusual architecture.

Our Mission

At Ancient Origins, we believe that one of the most important fields of knowledge we can pursue as human beings is our beginnings. And while some people may seem content with the story as it stands, our view is that there exists countless mysteries, scientific anomalies and surprising artifacts that have yet to be discovered and explained.

The goal of Ancient Origins is to highlight recent archaeological discoveries, peer-reviewed academic research and evidence, as well as offering alternative viewpoints and explanations of science, archaeology, mythology, religion and history around the globe.

We’re the only Pop Archaeology site combining scientific research with out-of-the-box perspectives.

By bringing together top experts and authors, this archaeology website explores lost civilizations, examines sacred writings, tours ancient places, investigates ancient discoveries and questions mysterious happenings. Our open community is dedicated to digging into the origins of our species on planet earth, and question wherever the discoveries might take us. We seek to retell the story of our beginnings. 

Ancient Image Galleries

View from the Castle Gate (Burgtor). (Public Domain)
Door surrounded by roots of Tetrameles nudiflora in the Khmer temple of Ta Phrom, Angkor temple complex, located today in Cambodia. (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Cable car in the Xihai (West Sea) Grand Canyon (CC BY-SA 4.0)