Demons in Your Toilet? Guardians of the Sewers and How They Protected Ancient Latrines
Monday, June 26, 2017 - 15:38

As a ritual symbol of purification, water plays a key role in the public space of hygiene and sanitary activities as well as in almost all religions past and present. From the first moment mankind invented rituals and deities, the notion of purification was attached to the act of ritual ablutions. The very act of washing was not only about cleaning oneself from dirt - it also freed one from spiritual impurities.

Bartłomiej Bartecki, director of the Museum in Hrubieszów presents the sword found in the Commune of Mircze.
Monday, June 26, 2017 - 14:08

An excavator operator who was working in a peat bog in Poland last month, accidentally discovered a magnificent 14th century longsword, which is in an extremely good condition. Experts believe that this is a unique find to the region.

Detail of ‘The Battle of Pavia’ (1528-1531) by Bernard van Orley and William Dermoyen.
Sunday, June 25, 2017 - 22:53

February 24, 1525. A day that is not marked in infamy but in the blood of France. On this date, the Battle of Pavia occurred – the decisive event in a longstanding war and rivalry, and the crushing blow for a king and his political desires.

Ancient Bones of Mystery Creature Dug up by Children in Yakutian Village
Sunday, June 25, 2017 - 18:59

Experts were called to check remains uncovered during road building excavations close to Tit-Ary in Khangalassky district. The remnants of the ancient creature were found in melting permafrost, revealed Varvara Kuzmina, head of the local school lore museum.

Detail of a modern depiction of the goddess Ishtar.
Sunday, June 25, 2017 - 14:04

As singer Pat Benatar once noted, love is a battlefield. Such use of military words to express intimate, affectionate emotions is likely related to love’s capacity to bruise and confuse.

The old packhorse bridge in Carrbridge, Scotland
Saturday, June 24, 2017 - 23:12

The oldest surviving packhorse bridge in the Scottish Highlands, the "coffin bridge" at Carrbridge in Inverness remains one of the most significant. Built in 1717, this packhorse bridge is located near the city of Inverness, capital of the Highlands, and was erected in an arch from "tooled rubble…springing from natural rock abutment".

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Archaeology News on Human Origins, Ancient Places and Mysterious Phenomena

Digesting Milk in Ethiopia

Should Humans Drink Cow’s Milk? Part 2 - Digesting Milk in Ethiopia

Yesterday we reported on a new study of our ancient Neolithic ancestors who first began the practice of dairy-related animal husbandry and discussed the implications this may have with regards to the...
Iron Age Fashion

Interesting Insight into Iron-Age Fashion

A new article published in the journal Antiquity has revealed the discovery of an Iron Age tunic two years ago under melting snow in a hunting area on the Norwegian Lendbreen glacier at 6,560 feet...
Ancient Greek sanctuary to receive 2,200-year-old cargo

Better Late than Never - Ancient Greek sanctuary to receive 2,200-year-old cargo

Over two millennia ago, a 10-metre column was ordered for the construction of a temple in one of the most important oracle centres in antiquity, Klaros, but it was sunk when the cargo ship carrying...
Ancient drawing with Cows and Milk

Should Adult Humans Drink Milk? Study of Neolithic Farmers May Have the Answer

Many would remember the days when a milk trolley would be rolled out during morning recess at school and all the children would come running for their daily glass of milk, or the TV images of...
Bolivian Amazon

Humans Explored the Amazon Much Earlier Than Previously Thought

New research published in the journal Plos One has revealed that humans explored the harsh environment of the western Amazon as early as 10,000 years ago, much earlier than previously thought. The...
Largest Ever Prehistoric Ancient City in China

Archaeologists Confirm Largest Ever Prehistoric Ancient City in China

After nearly two years of large-scale archaeological surveying, exploration, and excavation, archaeologists have recently confirmed that the Shimao Ruins covers an area of over four square kilometres...
stone age domesticated pigs

Stone Age Hunters Brought Home the Bacon

New research published in the journal Nature Communications has suggested that Stone Age hunter-gatherers in Europe may have been trading pigs with settled farmers as early as 5,000 BC. It is the...
Nepal Caves

Mystery of the ancient kingdom discovered in Nepal where thousands of caves are carved into cliffside

Hidden within the Himalayas, 155ft from the ground, are an estimated 10,000 man-made caves dug into the Cliffside or tunnelled from above. They remain one of the World’s greatest archaeological...
Ancient Libyan necropolis bulldozed - Cyrene

Ancient Libyan necropolis bulldozed

A section of the Cyrene necropolis, an extremely important historical site in Libya, has been destroyed by local farmers in order to make way for new houses and shops. The Cyrene necropolis is an...
Giant Footprints in India

Giant Footprints in Rock Evidence of Ancient People from the Sky?

In August 2013, in Piska Nagri village, on the outskirts of Ranchi City in Jharkahnd State, geologist Nitish Priyadarshi analysed a set of large footprints that, according to local legend, may...
Ancient Roman wine

Italian archaeologists set to produce ancient Roman wine

Archaeologists in Italy have planted a vineyard near Catania in Sicily with the aim of making wine using techniques from classical Rome described in ancient texts. The team based at the University of...
Beowulf and Grendel

Uncovering the long-lost secrets of Beowulf

For those who are unaware, Beowulf is an Old English heroic epic poem set in Scandinavia and cited as one of the most important works of Anglo-Saxon literature of all time. Dated between the 8 th and...
Gaza's ancient ruins

Archaeologists race against time to save Gaza's ancient ruins

A plethora of archaeological treasures lie scattered across the territory of what is now known as the Gaza strip, a stretch of land on the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea that borders Egypt...
Lincoln Castle Sarcophagus

Sarcophagus in Lincoln Castle Believed to Contain ‘Somebody Terribly Important’

Archaeologists in Britain believe they are on the verge of an important discovery as they are set to extract a sarcophagus discovered at Lincoln Castle , which was built by William the Conqueror in...
women ruled ancient Peru - Moche Culture

Tomb find confirms women ruled ancient Peru

Archaeologists have discovered a tomb belonging to a powerful pre-Hispanic priestess in Peru, the eighth in more than two decades, confirming that women ruled the region approximately 1,200 years ago...
Alexander the Great - tomp Greece

Have archaeologists discovered the grave of Alexander the Great?

Archaeologists have discovered an enormous marble tomb fit for a king under a huge mound in Greece and believe that they have unearthed the grave of Alexander the Great. The elaborate tomb was found...

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Top New Stories

Demons in Your Toilet? Guardians of the Sewers and How They Protected Ancient Latrines
As a ritual symbol of purification, water plays a key role in the public space of hygiene and sanitary activities as well as in almost all religions past and present. From the first moment mankind invented rituals and deities, the notion of purification was attached to the act of ritual ablutions. The very act of washing was not only about cleaning oneself from dirt - it also freed one from spiritual impurities.

Myths & Legends

Demons in Your Toilet? Guardians of the Sewers and How They Protected Ancient Latrines
As a ritual symbol of purification, water plays a key role in the public space of hygiene and sanitary activities as well as in almost all religions past and present. From the first moment mankind invented rituals and deities, the notion of purification was attached to the act of ritual ablutions. The very act of washing was not only about cleaning oneself from dirt - it also freed one from spiritual impurities.

Human Origins

Was the Heretic Pharaoh Akhenaton in Fact the Father of Modern Monotheism?
This passage may read like a passage from the Old Testament of the Bible; but, this is a quote from the Hymn of Aten, a work by Pharaoh Amenhotep IV better known as Akhenaton. This so-called heretic king was the only known Pharaoh in Egyptian history who believed in a monotheistic doctrine when most of the ancient world adhered to polytheism.

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At Ancient Origins, we believe that one of the most important fields of knowledge we can pursue as human beings is our beginnings. And while some people may seem content with the story as it stands, our view is that there exists countless mysteries, scientific anomalies and surprising artifacts that have yet to be discovered and explained.

The goal of Ancient Origins is to highlight recent archaeological discoveries, peer-reviewed academic research and evidence, as well as offering alternative viewpoints and explanations of science, archaeology, mythology, religion and history around the globe.

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By bringing together top experts and authors, this archaeology website explores lost civilizations, examines sacred writings, tours ancient places, investigates ancient discoveries and questions mysterious happenings. Our open community is dedicated to digging into the origins of our species on planet earth, and question wherever the discoveries might take us. We seek to retell the story of our beginnings. 

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View from the Castle Gate (Burgtor). (Public Domain)
Door surrounded by roots of Tetrameles nudiflora in the Khmer temple of Ta Phrom, Angkor temple complex, located today in Cambodia. (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Cable car in the Xihai (West Sea) Grand Canyon (CC BY-SA 4.0)