An Islamic State militant destroying artifacts in Iraq’s World Heritage city of Hatra

Erasing History: Why Islamic State is Blowing Up Ancient Artifacts

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One of the many tragedies that have unfolded in the wake of the Islamic State (IS) is their smashing of statues and the destruction of ancient archaeological sites. Indeed, the rapid and terrifying advance of the IS has proved fatal for much invaluable heritage.

They toppled priceless statues at the Mosul Museum in northern Iraq. They used sledgehammers and power tools to deface giant winged-bull statues at Nineveh on the outskirts of Mosul. At Nimrud, IS detonated explosives, turning the site into a giant, brown, mushroom cloud. They used assault rifles and pickaxes to destroy invaluable carvings at Hatra; and at Palmyra in Syria they blew up the 2,000-year-old temples dedicated to the pagan gods Baal Shamin and Bel.

It’s difficult to interpret the unprecedented scale of this heritage destruction. The global media and politicians have tended to frame these events as random casualties of wanton terror or as moments of unrestrained barbarism.

UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Director General Irina Bokova, for instance, reacted to the destruction of Nimrud by arguing that such attacks were underpinned by “ propaganda and hatred ”. There is, she said,  “absolutely no political or religious justification for the destruction of humanity’s cultural heritage ”.

However, in an article published recently in the  International Journal of Heritage Studies , we argue that the acts of heritage destruction undertaken by IS are much more than mere moments of propaganda devoid of political or religious justification.

We analysed two key IS media outlets: Dabiq, their glossy periodical online magazine, which is part manifesto, part call to arms, and part grisly newsletter; and the various slick propaganda films released by Al-Hayat.

We found that the heritage destruction wrought by IS was not only very deliberate and carefully staged, but underpinned by three specific and clearly articulated frameworks.

Theological

Firstly, the IS have gone to great theological (if selective) lengths to justify their iconoclasm. For example, an Al-Hayat film documenting the destruction at the Mosul Museum and Nineveh starts:

Oh Muslims, the remains that you see behind me are the idols of peoples of previous centuries, which were worshipped instead of Allah. The Assyrians, Akkadians, and others took for themselves gods of rain, of agriculture, and of war, and worshipped them along with Allah, and tried to appease them with all kinds of sacrifices… Since Allah commanded us to shatter and destroy these statues, idols, and remains, it is easy for us to obey, and we do not care [what people think], even if they are worth billions of dollars.

The destruction at Palmyra features in a double-page spread with 14 colour photographs in Dabiq. In the French edition, Dar-al-Islam, the text states:

Baal is a false divinity for which people sacrificed their children as indicated in the book of Jeremiah (Old Testament). But by the Grace of Allah, soldiers of the Caliphate destroyed it.

Historical

Secondly, the IS make frequent reference to key historical figures to justify their iconoclasm. These include the Prophet Abraham’s destruction of idols and the Prophet Muhammad’s iconoclasm at the Ka’ba, the centrepiece of Mecca’s mosque.

In an Al-Hayat film documenting the destruction at the Mosul Museum and Nineveh, one militant states:

The Prophet Muhammad shattered the idols with his own honourable hands when he conquered Mecca. The Prophet Muhammad commanded us to shatter and destroy statues. This is what his companions did later on, when they conquered lands.

Similar homage is also paid throughout the magazine Dabiq to other, more contemporary, moments of iconoclasm perpetrated by Islamic fundamentalists. These include the destruction of untold numbers of heritage sites by the  Wahhabi sect  across the Arabian peninsula from the mid-18th century; the Taliban’s destruction of the  Bamiyan Buddhas  in Afghanistan in 2001; and the destruction of the  al-‘Askari mosque by al-Qa’eda in Iraq in 2006.

Political

Finally, and often overlooked, the IS have used political reasoning to justify the destruction. One Dabiq article states:

The kuffār [unbelievers] had unearthed these statues and ruins in recent generations and attempted to portray them as part of a cultural heritage and identity that the Muslims of Iraq should embrace and be proud of. Yet this opposes the guidance of Allah and His Messenger and only serves a nationalist agenda.

We can see two dimensions of the IS’s political iconoclasm here. First, it is an attack on “the kuffār”. These are presumably Westerners who, as part of the colonial period, drew the modern borders and created the contemporary states of the Middle East. They also excavated Mesopotamian archaeological sites and placed relics in public museums to be admired.

Comments

“These include the Prophet Abraham’s destruction of idols and the Prophet Muhammad’s iconoclasm at the Ka’ba”

The absurd contention that Muhammad's “religion” is somehow descended from – and legitimized by – the Biblical religion is completely indefensible. At best, Muhammad clumsily appropriated elements of what he knew of the Old and New Testaments.

If Muhammad had worshiped Abraham’s God, then he would have said and done what Abraham taught and practiced and not the diabolical and totalitarian ideology that he transmitted to his followers.

AintGottaClue's picture

Anyone who actually studies the history of Islam/Mohammed will certainly not be left with the impression Mohammed followed the beliefs of Abraham! From a Biblical point of view, the Islamic religion can be said to be a continuation of the split between the followers of Abraham's descendants and the followers of Ishmael's descendants.....which is precisely why there is such animosity between the Jews and Islam.

The history of Mohammed, himself, is one of a seriously, mentally deranged individual, who developed a following of like-minded mental cases, and developed a "religion" that is nothing more than an oppressive criminal enterprise run by the Clerical hierarchy for their own benefit.

http://www.bibleprobe.com/muhammad.htm

http://www.williamapercy.com/wiki/index.php?title=Historical_Facts_about...

https://www.amazon.com/Truth-About-Muhammad-Intolerant-Religion/dp/15969...

History is nowhere near as well known as we think it is.

Temples devoted to different faces of the deceiver, where human sacrifices were made. The western media only mad because it is full of satanic fucking losers

The damage done by ISIS pales in comparison to that perpetrated by the American terrorists.

AintGottaClue's picture

And just who might these "American terrorists" be?

History is nowhere near as well known as we think it is.

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