Main: The west tower of the Frankfurt Imperial Cathedral, under which were interred two Medieval children, one with a Christian burial the other a pagan burial.

Double Medieval child burial, one Pagan, one Christian, mystifies German researchers

(Read the article on one page)

Archaeologists say the circumstances of the death and double burial of two little children who died in Medieval Frankfurt, Germany, will probably never be known. One of the children had an apparently royal Merovingian, Christian burial, and the other a pagan Scandinavian burial. The children were honored many years after their death by careful placement of a royal chapel around their grave.

Their remains were found in 1992, and archaeologists are just now releasing the results of the scientific examination of the bodies and gravesite. The team announced the children were buried sometime between 700 and 730 AD. The grave is in a priest’s residence, the priory of a tiny church at what later would become the Frankfurt Cathedral in the 1300s.

The west tower of the Frankfurt Imperial Cathedral, under which were interred two Medieval children, one with a Christian burial the other a pagan burial.

The west tower of the Frankfurt Imperial Cathedral, under which were interred two Medieval children, one with a Christian burial the other a pagan burial. (Photo by :edelecs/ Wikimedia Commons )

In 855 a palace chapel at the site built by King Louis II was aligned exactly with the grave, leading the researchers to conclude the children were honored long after their deaths. It may have been an accident of design, but the children’s graves were also aligned with the Frankfurt Cathedral, which was built in the 1200s.

The research team, led by Professor Egan Wamers of the Frankfurt Archaeological Museum, published the results of their findings in a book. The book is in German and is available for sale .

The Local, a German newspaper, reports Wamers as saying the researchers don’t know why the children were honored in this way with the burial and the later architectural consideration given their grave.

The floor plan of the Frankfurt Cathedral, showing in dark red near the center the building where the children’s remains were buried.

The floor plan of the Frankfurt Cathedral, showing in dark red near the center the building where the children’s remains were buried. (Graphic by the Frankfurt Archaeological Museum)

“One can assume they played a significant role in this aristocratic class in Frankfurt,” he said. “... We know of a number of these Adelsheiligen [noble saints] in the early Middle Ages. Educated, high-class people had easier access to saintly status.”

The girl’s high status was clearly evident by the clothing she was dressed in, including a tunic and shawl; and jewelry for her ears, fingers, arms, neck and chest made of gold, silver, bronze and precious stones.

The other child had a necklace that was a copy of a Scandinavian amulet. That and the fact that the cremated remains were mixed with bear bones show close ties between northern Europe and the Germanic tribes. These ties, The Local says, had been developing in the 7 th century AD.

While archaeologists have been excavating in Frankfurt for many years, the medieval history of the city remains a mystery. This photo, which shows the first city walls, was taken in 1906.

While archaeologists have been excavating in Frankfurt for many years, the medieval history of the city remains a mystery. This photo, which shows the first city walls, was taken in 1906. ( Wikimedia Commons )

It is possible the two children had been promised to each other for marriage, Wamers said. But he added that researchers can only speculate about this strange burial. This is the first burial ever found in Frankfurt from before Charlemagne’s Great Synod of 794 AD. Wamers said it is unlikely the world will ever know the circumstances of the deaths and burial of the two children.

The settlement of Franconofurd, as it was known, was important from at least the time of the Roman Empire. Frankish kings held itinerant court and built on the hilltop site, which was on an important trade route with north-south and east-west axes.

The archaeology and therefore the lives of the early medieval people of Franconofurd are wrapped in mystery. Archaeologists intend to dig around the cathedral complex where there was once a royal palace. They hope to find worked precious metal, especially from the 9 th and 10 th centuries.

"We have very few high-value finds, like Carolingian swords or graves of men, almost nothing in Frankfurt made of metal that could give us more information about what was going on here,” Wamers said.

Featured image: Main: The west tower of the Frankfurt Imperial Cathedral, under which were interred two Medieval children, one with a Christian burial the other a pagan burial. ( Wikipedia). Inset: An artist's impression of how the girl found buried under the cathedral might have looked. Image: Archäologisches Museum Frankfurt.

By Mark Miller

 

Comments

While I had never heard of dual interment in the same grave, my first impression was that it was a means of ensuring an unbaptized child would go to Heaven.

I am not clear as to why the Merovingian child would be buried so far from the family seat? More questions arise when one considers that Frankfurt is far from a place where a Scandinavian would be buried.

Mark Miller's picture

Thank you for pointing this out, Simone8. I don't read German. I edited the article.

 

 

You write:
"The research team [...] published the results of their findings in the journal Schnell & Stiener. The article is in German and is behind a pay wall." When I checked the link, I found this is not correct.
Schnell & Stiener is a publishing house, not a journal. And it is not an article behind a pay wall, but it is a book (of 256 pages).

Not being an archaeologist by trade anything I said can only be my personal opinion. I visited couple of Merovingian necropolis located with a stone throw from where I live monumentally in France and one thing I've noticed was the absence of Christian symbols. Most of the one found were added later. Although few Black Madonnas were found inside the graves which could very well representation of Isis (Iset or Aset in Egyptian). The Goddess religion was prevalent in the times of the Merovingian but to avoid the fate accorded to heretics many Merovingian were hiding their beliefs. Although it is surprising to find two bodies in one grave, nothing is further from the truth to call one of them Christian. After all Chilperic II place a statue of Isis in one of the Parisian church, which was destroy by an archbishop in the XVII century.

Register to become part of our active community, get updates, receive a monthly newsletter, and enjoy the benefits and rewards of our member point system OR just post your comment below as a Guest.

Myths & Legends

A vase-scene from about 410 BC. Nimrod/Herakles, wearing his fearsome lion skin headdress, spins Noah/Nereus around and looks him straight in the eye. Noah gets the message and grimaces, grasping his scepter, a symbol of his rule - soon to be displaced in the post-Flood world by Nimrod/Herakles, whose visage reveals a stern smirk.
The Book of Genesis describes human history. Ancient Greek religious art depicts human history. While their viewpoints are opposite, the recounted events and characters match each other in convincing detail. This brief article focuses on how Greek religious art portrayed Noah, and how it portrayed Nimrod in his successful rebellion against Noah’s authority.

Human Origins

Cro-Magnon man communicating with each other and producing cave drawings
How human language began has been a question pestering researchers for centuries. One of the biggest issues with this topic is that empirical evidence is still lacking despite our great advances in...

Ancient Technology

The School of Athens
Much of modern science was known in ancient times. Robots and computers were a reality long before the 1940´s. The early Bronze Age inhabitants of the Levant used computers in stone, the Greeks in the 2nd century BC invented an analogue computer known as the Antikythera mechanism. An ancient Hindu book gives detailed instructions for the construction of an aircraft –ages before the Wright brothers. Where did such knowledge come from?

Our Mission

At Ancient Origins, we believe that one of the most important fields of knowledge we can pursue as human beings is our beginnings. And while some people may seem content with the story as it stands, our view is that there exists countless mysteries, scientific anomalies and surprising artifacts that have yet to be discovered and explained.

The goal of Ancient Origins is to highlight recent archaeological discoveries, peer-reviewed academic research and evidence, as well as offering alternative viewpoints and explanations of science, archaeology, mythology, religion and history around the globe.

We’re the only Pop Archaeology site combining scientific research with out-of-the-box perspectives.

By bringing together top experts and authors, this archaeology website explores lost civilizations, examines sacred writings, tours ancient places, investigates ancient discoveries and questions mysterious happenings. Our open community is dedicated to digging into the origins of our species on planet earth, and question wherever the discoveries might take us. We seek to retell the story of our beginnings. 

Ancient Image Galleries

View from the Castle Gate (Burgtor). (Public Domain)
Door surrounded by roots of Tetrameles nudiflora in the Khmer temple of Ta Phrom, Angkor temple complex, located today in Cambodia. (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Cable car in the Xihai (West Sea) Grand Canyon (CC BY-SA 4.0)
Next article