The newly-discovered underground causeway leading to the Great Pyramid of Giza.

After Decades of Searching, the Causeway for the Great Pyramid of Egypt has been Found

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Dozens of foreign missions carried out over three decades using the latest high-tech instruments failed to find the causeway of the Great Pyramid of Giza. Now, unexpectedly, the passage has finally been located by a local resident living near the Giza Plateau, who was illegally digging beneath his home when he discovered a tunnel leading to the Pyramid of Khufu, the largest of the three pyramids in Giza.

Arabic news source reports that a resident in the village of El Haraneya in Giza, a prohibited area for drilling, began digging beneath his house to a depth of about 10 meters (33 feet), when he discovered a passage consisting of huge stone blocks.

The Minister of Police for Tourism and Antiquities was alerted to the discovery and security forces immediately placed a cordon around the property.  The Ministry of Antiquities was notified of the incredible finding, and archaeologist Kamal Wahid was placed in charge of a committee to investigate. In its report, the committee confirms the finding of the corridor leading to the Great Pyramid, the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in Giza.

The Great Pyramid of Giza

The Great Pyramid of Giza. Source: BigStockPhoto

The Khufu pyramid complex consisted of a Valley Temple near the Nile River, which was once connected to a long causeway that led to the Temple of Khufu (also known by the Hellenized name, Cheops). This temple was connected to the pyramid.  The discovery of basalt paving and limestone walls suggests the Valley Temple is buried beneath the village of Nazlet el-Samman.  

Artist's reconstruction of the pyramids of Giza, showing the long causeways attached to each complex

Artist's reconstruction of the pyramids of Giza, showing the long causeways attached to each complex. ( Saint Anselm College )

Despite decades of research and excavations, only a few remnants of the causeway (a covered, raised road, like an above ground tunnel), which linked the pyramid with the Valley Temple have been found, until now. 

Ancient Greek Historian Herodotus, who visited the Great Pyramid in the 5 th century BC, described the causeway as being about a kilometre (0.6 miles) long, though this account is contested by modern Egyptologists.  Former Minister of State for Antiquities, Dr Zahi Hawass, estimated the total length of the causeway as being about 825 meters.

In his second book of ‘Histories’, Herodotus described the causeway as being totally enclosed and decorated in fine reliefs. He wrote:

there passed ten years while the causeway was made by which they drew the stones, which causeway they built, and it is a work not much less, as it appears to me, than the pyramid; for the length of it is five furlongs and the breadth ten fathoms and the height, where it is highest, eight fathoms, and it is made of stone smoothed and with figures carved upon it. For this, they said, the ten years were spent, and for the underground chambers on the hill upon which the pyramids stand 
Herodotus: Second book of the Histories .

Drawing of the remnants of a causeway leading to the Great Pyramid

Drawing of the remnants of a causeway leading to the Great Pyramid, 1979 ( Wikimedia Commons )

The causeway of the second pyramid of Giza, Khafra’s pyramid, survived to some degree, however, it is in Saqqara, at the causeway of Unas’ pyramid, where one is able to get a better perspective for what they once looked like.  The Unas’ causeway, which even has a small section of the roof remaining, is the best surviving causeway.

“It consisted of a covered passageway, 720m long, its interior surfaces decorated with high quality reliefs depicting a range of colourful scenes,” writes the Egyptian sites blog . “The walls were lit by a slit in the roof of the causeway which ran along the whole of its length. The theme of decoration on the causeway walls progresses from the living world in the east to the land of the dead in the west.”

Causeway of the Pyramid of Unas

Causeway of the Pyramid of Unas ( Wikimedia Commons )

For now, very little information has been released regarding the discovery of the passageway leading to the Great Pyramid in Giza. However, it is hoped that as investigations by the Ministry of Antiquities progress, we may have a much richer understanding of the great pyramid complex at Giza.

Featured image: The newly-discovered underground causeway leading to the Great Pyramid of Giza. Credit:

By April Holloway


While i personally think Dr Hawass should be considered guilty of crimes against humanity for his role in hiding the truth about the pyramids, he does provide an important function. Whenever he makes a claim about the pyramids, or Egyptology in general, we know it is likely untrue. For instance, we know it is not possible for humans to have built the pyramids in the time frame claimed. ( not spouting alien theories here, I am refering to the physical time required to place the stones.) , therefore it means nothing when he says Egyptians built the pyramids. Likewise, since we know the pyramids were NEVER used as tombs, we can infer that he is aware of, and hiding, their true function. While I will fault his character for not having the backbone to reveall the things he knows, i can never the less, resepect that he is indeed performing the job which he has been hired to do, whether he is employed by the Egyptian Government or not is a completely different matter.

There are so many silly comments here but nobody questions this story, there seems to be no other follow-up to it.

The direction to the village of El-Haraneya is south of east, in totally the wrong direction for the causeway as described by any previous articles or evidence. Furthermore it is over 3km from the great pyramid. If the valley temple is concluded to be under the village of Nazlet el-Samman, which is located right next to the great pyramid, why is there a supposed tunnel/causeway extended beyond that by a few kilometers to El Haranneya ? It makes no sense at all. This village is far from the GP.

A previous "illegal dig" by a resident of Nazlet el-Samman purported to have found the same tunnel leading to the great pyramid, but this is in a totally different direction. But at least it is closer to the GP and somewhat more credible. And also, in that case photographs were available of the illegal dig and the subsequent demolition of the house, and what appears to be a cover-up. You can view the demolition site at 29°58'35.16"N 31° 8'20.22"E.

May I venture to suggest that the story lacks credibility?


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