Voynich Manuscript Decoded

First words in mysterious Voynich Manuscript decoded

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We’ve got to hand it to the persistent and determined researchers who have not given up hope of decoding the enigmatic Voynich manuscript despite dozens of studies over the last few decades, many of which have provided clues, but none of which have solved the mystery. Could the latest study finally bring us one step closer to understanding this mysterious text?

The 15th Century Voynich manuscript is considered to be the most mysterious text ever uncovered as it has never been deciphered despite over a century of attempts to uncover its meaning and more than 25 different analyses from top minds around the world. This has led some to claim that the Voynich manuscript is nothing more than an elaborate hoax.  The 240 page book, which uses a cryptic language and numerous illustrations depicting astronomical, biological, cosmological, herbal and pharmaceutical themes, was discovered in 1912 by a Polish-American named Wilfrid M. Voynich.  While the manuscript appears to be written in an unknown language, latest finding supports the hypothesis that there are meaningful words and messages within the text.

Latest research also supports this perspective. Stephen Bax, a professor of applied linguistics at the University of Bedfordshire in England, says he's deciphered 14 characters of the script and can read a handful of items in the Voynich text, such as the words for coriander, hellebore and juniper next to drawings of the plants. He says he's also picked out the word for Taurus written beside an illustration of the Pleiades, a star cluster in the constellation Taurus.

"I hit on the idea of identifying proper names in the text, following historic approaches which successfully deciphered Egyptian hieroglyphs and other mystery scripts, and I then used those names to work out part of the script," Bax said in a statement.

"The manuscript has a lot of illustrations of stars and plants," Bax added. "I was able to identify some of these, with their names, by looking at medieval herbal manuscripts in Arabic and other languages, and I then made a start on a decoding, with some exciting results."

Bax’s research is the second study in the last month to investigate the enigma of the Voynich manuscript. A couple of weeks ago, we reported on a study which found a link between illustrations of plants in the manuscript and depictions in 16th century records from Mexico of plants native to Central America, suggesting a new origin for the text.

Bax notes that the manuscript is still a long way from being understood, and that he is coming forward with what he's found thus far in the hopes that other linguists will work with him to crack the code. For now, he thinks the book is "probably a treatise on nature, perhaps in a Near Eastern or Asian language."

Mr Bax has explained his findings in the below video:

By April Holloway

Comments

Please send us PROOVES about your VOYNICH Manuscript interpretation ...
It's just too hard to beleive you ...

aprilholloway's picture

We don't try to make people believe us - we report on latest news, it doesn't mean we ourselves necessarily agree or disagree with it. Rather, our aim is to inform people of the latest research. Within the article, there is a link to the original source, where you can read more, as well as a video at the end which explains the research. 

Interesting...I want to see more once they have decoded a more of this. It seems to me to be some sort of medical journal if you will, but you never know what it may uncover. There could be a new use for a common plant that we may not know about, or some healing aspects of said plants. Since it has all these other topics in there outside of plants, it really makes me wonder where it truly originated and why it exsists.

Good day!
My name is Nikolai.
To a question about the key to the Voynich manuscript.
Today, I have to add on this matter following.
The manuscript was written no letters, and signs for the letters of the alphabet of one of the ancient languages. Moreover, in the text there are 2 more levels of encryption to virtually eliminate the possibility of computer-assisted translation, even after replacing the signs letters.
I pick up the key by which the first section I was able to read the following words: hemp, hemp clothing; food, food (sheet of 20 numbering on the Internet); cleaned (intestines), knowledge may wish to drink a sugary drink (nectar), maturation (maturity), to consider, to think (sheet 107); drink; six; flourishing; growing; rich; peas; sweet drink nectar and others. It is only a short word, mark 2-3. To translate words consisting of more than 2.3 characters is necessary to know this ancient language.
If you are interested, I am ready to send more detailed information, including scans of pages indicating the translated words.
Sincerely, Nicholas.

All above and Baxes notes are completely wrong. The manuscript is not coded but is written in old language with a still existing alphabet. The first page is introduction of the author and is very professionally written. I have tried to help some of the researchers in interpretation, but they deny anything that does not prove them right...What shall I do to bring the truth to the public?

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