Priest hole in the cupboard of Harvington Hall, Worcestershire

Hiding to Avoid Hanging: Priest Holes, Hidden Chambers, and Secret Passages

(Read the article on one page)

Under the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England, which began in 1558, Catholics were persecuted by law and priests were imprisoned, tortured, and frequently executed. As a result of this oppression, wealthy Catholic families began building secret chambers and passages in their homes called ‘priest holes’ in order to hide priests when the pursuivants or ‘priest hunters’ came searching.

During the 16 th century, Europe was under the religious leadership of the Roman Catholic Church. However, over time, protests against the Catholic Church and its influence eventually led to the formation of the Protestant movement. The separation of the Church of England from Rome under Henry VIII in 1537 brought England alongside this broad Reformation movement, which came to influence the Church of England decisively under the reign of Queen Elizabeth I.

During Elizabeth’s reign, the constant threat posed by recurring plots involving the Catholic Mary Queen of Scots heightened the severity of the situation and an Act was passed making it High Treason for a Catholic priest to enter England or for anyone to aid a priest that did. To enforce the Act, ‘priest hunters’ were given the job to hunt down and capture any such priests.  Arrest meant imprisonment, and often torture and execution.

The Protestant Reformation came to influence the Church of England decisively under the reign of Queen Elizabeth I.

The Protestant Reformation came to influence the Church of England decisively under the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. The "Darnley Portrait" of Elizabeth I ( Wikipedia)

Priests hid in Catholic homes

In 1540, the Jesuit religious order was created to assist the Catholic Church in opposing the Protestant movement. Jesuit priests snuck into England to support Catholic families and many of these families hid the priests in their homes.

Once the pursuivants or ‘priest hunters’ were established, it was no longer enough for these families to claim the priests were simply friends or cousins. Now with the risk of torture and death, the priests had to be carefully hidden away if the pursuivants ever came knocking on the door.

Priest hunters took their job very seriously, sometimes searching a house for days or even weeks. They would move furniture, lift floorboards, bang the walls for sounds of a hollow cavity, and plunge their swords between cracks and crevices. They counted windows from the outside and inside, and measured the height of ceilings and the length of walls, in the hope of detecting hidden chambers.

Clearly, the priest holes had to be very cleverly constructed to evade such extensive searches.

The consequences if a priest were captured. Engraving by Gaspar Bouttats.

The consequences if a priest were captured. Engraving by Gaspar Bouttats. ( Wikipedia)

The construction of priest holes

Priest holes needed to be disguised very well and were frequently built into fireplaces, attics, and staircases. Sometimes, a network of passages led to the final hiding place, at other times the priest hole was hidden inside another chamber, making it more difficult to find.

However, more often than not the priest holes were tiny with no room to stand or move. Priests sometimes had to stay for days at a time with little to no food and water, and no sanitation. Sometimes, they would die of starvation or suffocation if the priest hunts went on for too long.

A "priest hole" (hiding) behind the panelling in a room called withdrawing room in 16th c. manor house, Harvington Hall, Worcestershire, UK.

A "priest hole" (hiding) behind the panelling in a room called withdrawing room in 16th c. manor house, Harvington Hall, Worcestershire, UK. ( Wikimedia Commons )

False perspectives and illusion, much like those employed by stage magicians today, were used to hide the secret chambers. Some large estates, like Hindlip House, had up to twelve separate priest holes, and often other building alterations needed to be undertaken so as not to arouse suspicion.

Harvington Hall in Worcestershire, England, which is today open to the public, is recognized as having some of the finest surviving examples of priest holes in Britain. They were created so masterfully that no priest was ever discovered, despite searches from the pursuivants.

Cross section of the West side of Harvington Hall, showing the hiding places. The false fireplace in the Marble Room led to two hides in the attics

Cross section of the West side of Harvington Hall, showing the hiding places. The false fireplace in the Marble Room led to two hides in the attics ( Harvington Hall ).

Nicholas Owen, master constructor of priest holes

Nicholas Owen was the most skilled and prolific builder of priest holes. A Jesuit brother, Owen dedicated his life to constructing secret chambers to protect the lives of Catholic priests.  In the book Secret Chambers and Hiding Places , Alan Fea describes how he artfully designed and created priest hides:

“With incomparable skill, he knew how to conduct priests to a place of safety along subterranean passages, to hide them between walls and bury them in impenetrable recesses, and to entangle them in labyrinths and a thousand windings”.

Register to become part of our active community, get updates, receive a monthly newsletter, and enjoy the benefits and rewards of our member point system OR just post your comment below as a Guest.

Our Mission

At Ancient Origins, we believe that one of the most important fields of knowledge we can pursue as human beings is our beginnings. And while some people may seem content with the story as it stands, our view is that there exists countless mysteries, scientific anomalies and surprising artifacts that have yet to be discovered and explained.

The goal of Ancient Origins is to highlight recent archaeological discoveries, peer-reviewed academic research and evidence, as well as offering alternative viewpoints and explanations of science, archaeology, mythology, religion and history around the globe.

We’re the only Pop Archaeology site combining scientific research with out-of-the-box perspectives.

By bringing together top experts and authors, this archaeology website explores lost civilizations, examines sacred writings, tours ancient places, investigates ancient discoveries and questions mysterious happenings. Our open community is dedicated to digging into the origins of our species on planet earth, and question wherever the discoveries might take us. We seek to retell the story of our beginnings. 

Ancient Image Galleries

View from the Castle Gate (Burgtor). (Public Domain)
Door surrounded by roots of Tetrameles nudiflora in the Khmer temple of Ta Phrom, Angkor temple complex, located today in Cambodia. (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Cable car in the Xihai (West Sea) Grand Canyon (CC BY-SA 4.0)
Next article