Roman tax collector calculating someone's taxes on an abacus

Can You Imagine a Taxation System Where the Wealthy Competed to Pay the Highest Taxes? It Really Happened!

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Can you imagine a progressive tax system that motivates the wealthiest members of society to voluntarily pay large amounts of tax instead of implementing tax avoidance schemes, as is currently the norm in most parts of the world? Welcome to the marvelous mechanisms of the ancient Greek economy.

An Introduction to the Ancient Greek Economy

Ancient Greek civilization flourished from around 776 to 30 BC. This long period of economic, cultural, and political domination didn’t just happen coincidentally, a lot of factors contributed to it. The ancient Greek economy—despite remaining somewhat of an enigma to this day—was definitely one of the main elements that played a crucial role in the country’s expansion and influence around the world.

The economy of ancient Greece was defined largely by the region’s dependence on imported goods since it lacked a consolidated, centralized economy in the modern sense of the word. The ancient Greek economy has been a topic of debate between historians and economists for quite some time now. On one side there are those who view it as “primitive” or even reactionary, and on the other are those who consider it “progressive and evolutionary.” As for the truth? As usually happens in such cases, it lies somewhere in the middle.

Undoubtedly, there are a lack of sophisticated terms to describe all the overarching systems of commerce and trade organization in the ancient Greek economy, while economics itself—in contrast with other subjects such as mathematics or philosophy, which have been exhaustively interpreted—was mainly understood in terms of the localized management of necessary goods. Despite these facts, the economist Murray Rothbard has argued that ancient Greek philosophers were fully concerned with matters that would today fall under the discipline of economic theory.

Greek coins hoarded centuries ago yield information on the ancient economy, according to digitized research by Stanford classics Professor Josiah Ober and his students. (Image credit: Courtesy American Numismatic Society)

Greek coins hoarded centuries ago yield information on the ancient economy, according to digitized research by Stanford classics Professor Josiah Ober and his students. (Image credit: Courtesy American Numismatic Society)

The Genius System of Taxation in Ancient Athens

While there are many inventions that the ancient Greeks gave to the modern world, one thing we certainly didn’t borrow from them was their taxation system. To be more specific, we are referring to the ancient Athenian tax system (as it’s not possible to know the taxation of every Greek city-state), which was based on a system of leitourgia, or liturgy, which meant “public service.” It might be hard to imagine this today, but in ancient Athens the richest of the rich literally competed to pay the most taxes, and the poor were treated to festivals and shows from that tax money. You are probably wondering why and how. Well, it’s not as complicated as you might think.

The wealthiest Athenian citizens and foreign residents (metoikoi) were challenged to fund public programs through the system of leitourgia. The state selected some to be gumnasiarkhai, who funded and maintained the public gymnasia. The khoregoi (sponsors) were the ones who funded the training of theatrical choruses, and the trierarkhoi funded triremes (warships) and their crews. Occasionally, a special tax called the eisforá was exacted, even though it’s recorded that by the fourth century BC the wealthiest citizens of Athens paid it annually. There were some exceptions, however, like the Peloponnesian War, during which all Athenians had to contribute as much as they could to the eisforá for the soldiers’ wages.

Block V of the eastern Parthenon Frieze, perhaps depicting the arrhephoroi, part of the liturgical calendar

Block V of the eastern Parthenon Frieze, perhaps depicting the arrhephoroi, part of the liturgical calendar ( CC by SA 3.0 )

The beauty of the liturgy system was that public works tended to be funded and managed by people with relevant expertise rather than by some less accountable state official. These tasks came with great prestige, and even though it is unknown how they were exactly assigned, what we know is that the rich saw the whole thing as an unofficial Olympic “competition” where they competed against each other concerning who will donate the most, in order to gain higher status.

As a matter of fact, no more than a few hundred rich Athenians (some sources note three hundred) voluntarily paid the vast majority of the taxes, even though they did not pay them directly to the state. Instead, they made sure that the services required by society were fulfilled and that they were worshiped as great donors and sponsors, having paid their taxes directly to the programs that created and maintained these services. In other words, a rich Athenian had to prove his wealth with actions and for this he was revered by his fellow citizens. So, avoiding paying taxes—like the majority of rich Greeks do today—would not only have been shameful, but also an act that would have downgraded their public image and position in Athenian society.

Comments

THIS ISN’T HISTORY, INSTEAD, IT IS JUST SOME PEOPLE WHO FELT THAT IF THEY PAID MORE IN TAXES, IT WOULD RAISE THEIR CITIZENSHIP STATUS TO A HIGHER LEVEL…  IT APPEARS TO BE SOMEWHAT NARCISSISTIC  AND HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH HELPING THE ECONOMY, EVEN THOUGH IT CERTAINLY DID PERFORM THAT JOB WITHOUT BEING ITS INTENTION.  THERE WAS NOTHING SOPHISTICATED ABOUT PEOPLE TRYING TO PAY MORE TAXES AT THAT TIME ANYMORE THAN PEOPLE WHO DONATE TO GOODWILL STORES TO REAP TAX BENEFITS INSTEAD OF CLASS STATUS.….

Charles Bowles

AintGottaClue's picture

One can only wonder what America would be like today if it followed such a scheme!

History is nowhere near as well known as we think it is.

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