The death of Cleopatra

The dramatic death of Cleopatra – was it really suicide?

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According to accepted historical accounts, Cleopatra, the last active pharaoh of ancient Egypt who ruled after Alexander the Great’s death during the Hellenistic period, committed suicide by holding a snake to her body and allowing it to bite her, killing her with its poisonous venom.  Memories of Cleopatra's life have vanished as monuments and palaces have fallen to ruins over the millennia.  But the question still remains: did she really commit suicide, or was there something more sinister involved? 

Cleopatra was born in 69 BC and lived and died in Alexandria.  She was a member of the Macedonian Greek royalty and her family ruled Egypt for more than three centuries.  She was well educated and fluent in seven languages.  Although there was no history of suicide in her family, there were cases of murder in every direction.  Cleopatra is described as fiery and strong-willed, begging the question was to whether she would really have just given up and ended it all.

At the young age of 18, she inherited the throne and married her ten-year-old brother, Ptolemy XIII.  Although it was intended for them to rule as joint monarchs, Cleopatra had no intention of sharing power with her younger sibling.  However, there came a time when Ptolemy XIII challenged Cleopatra – it was not long after that he was found dead; a similar fate occurred at different times to her other siblings. It is thought that Cleopatra was responsible for two out of five of her sibling’s deaths. 

Cleopatra was afraid that she would be accused of a murder plot so she began to court the powers of the Roman Empire.  As it is written, she was a lover of Julius Caesar and bore him a son.  However, after Caesar's assassination in 44 BC, she aligned with Mark Antony, who ruled Rome in the power vacuum following Caesar's death, and was in opposition to Caesar's legal heir, Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (Octavian).  According to historical accounts, after losing the Battle of Actium to Octavian's forces, Mark Antony committed suicide and Cleopatra followed suit. Octavian then made Egypt a Roman province and became its first emperor, changing his name to Augustus.

Cleopatra and Caesar

Cleopatra and Caesar by Jean-Leon-Gerome, 1866. (Public Domain)

The Gedanken thought experiment

A Gedanken study is a thought experiment to test the plausibility of a hypothesis, and several such studies have been drawn up to examine the supposed facts surrounding the death of Cleopatra. 

Cleopatra’s mausoleum is known to have been located close to a palace where Octavian was living in Alexandria, Egypt. As the story goes, Cleopatra was in her mausoleum when she wrote out a suicide note, which was given to a guard and delivered to Octavian.  It is apparently soon after that she held a snake, known as an asp, to her breast and was bitten and killed. 

Is this plausible?  It doesn’t seem so. The guard, who was supposedly unaware of the note’s contents, would have taken only a few minutes to walk several hundred meters to give Octavian the note and then a few minutes to return, but medically speaking, it has been suggested that it would have taken a couple of hours for the asp venom to kill Cleopatra, if at all.  Experts have said that, on average, only fifty percent of asp venom is injected in one bite suggesting that she would have had a high chance of survival from such a bite.

The Death of Cleopatra by Reginald Arthur

The Death of Cleopatra by Reginald Arthur, 1892. (Public Domain). According to historical accounts, Cleopatra committed suicide by allowing a snake known as an asp to bite her.

A piece of information that tends to make some individuals think that Cleopatra did commit suicide (although faulty) is found in the Temple File.  In the temple, sits a carving of Isis surrounded by a snake.  Cleopatra was thought to be the living reincarnation of Isis suggesting that her destiny was intermeshed with the snake.

One suggestion is that Octavian murdered Cleopatra as part of his plan to take over the empire. Octavian had control over the western Roman Empire, while Mark Antony had control over the east.  Since Octavian wanted control over the whole empire, he used Cleopatra as a pawn and declared war. 

Octavian felt that he could capture Cleopatra and humiliate her.  This information comes from Octavian's own memoirs so its accuracy must also be questioned.  At the time, Cleopatra's son (Cizarian) was seen as a threat to Rome by Octavian.  Several days before Octavian arrived in Alexandria, Cleopatra sent Cizarian to Ethiopia for his own protection.  Nevertheless, Cizarian was found and murdered. Some scholars suggest that it was Octavian who sent his guards to murder Cleopatra after he killed her son, allowing him to take control over the empire.  Indeed, Cleopatra’s body was found alongside two of her maids, suggesting that it was foul play at work and not suicide.

Comments

Cleopatra being the pharaoh would have been embalmed and put in a tomb that
remains to be found.When her tomb is excavated her remains may or may not
indicate the cause of death.It is possible that Octavian saw her once briefly but
most likely saw a servant, someone accustomed to portraying her under a veil.The
body was that of the servant while Cleo's body was secretly removed by the priests.

Cleopatra was a member of the Ptolemaic dynasty, a family of Macedonian Greek[2]origin that ruled Egypt after Alexander the Great's death during the Hellenistic period. The Ptolemies, throughout their dynasty, spoke Greek[3] and refused to speak Egyptian, which is the reason that Greek as well as Egyptian languages were used on official court documents such as the Rosetta Stone.[4 The name derives from the Greek components: ΚΛΕΟΣ -ΠΑΤΉΡ =father's glory. Cleo was Alexander the great's distant descedant..

"Cleo was Alexander the great's distant descedant.." What exactly is a distant descendant? Was she related by blood to Alexander or not? Or was she a direct descendant of Ptolemy? Or were the three of them part of one big happy family?

Cleopatra was a member of the Ptolemaic dynasty, a family of Macedonian Greek[2]origin that ruled Egypt after Alexander the Great's death during the Hellenistic period. The Ptolemies, throughout their dynasty, spoke Greek[3] and refused to speak Egyptian, which is the reason that Greek as well as Egyptian languages were used on official court documents such as the Rosetta Stone.[4 The name derives from the Greek components: ΚΛΕΟΣ -ΠΑΤΉΡ =father's glory. Cleo was Alexander the great's distant descedant..

The theory of homicide is analyzed through criminal profiling and crime scene analysis methodology in The Murder of Cleopatra published by Prometheus Books.

http://www.amazon.com/Murder-Cleopatra-Historys-Greatest-Cold-ebook/dp/B...

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