Europe

The legendary Furies of ancient Greek mythology

The legendary Furies of ancient Greek mythology

The Furies of Greek mythology are monstrous women who lived in the underworld and avenged murders, particularly matricides. In Greek they are called Erinyes, a name thought to have come from the...
The Ancient Grotto of the Seven Sleepers

The Ancient Grotto of the Seven Sleepers

The short story Rip Van Winkle , written in 1819 by an American writer, Washington Irving, is about a man who woke up after a sleep of more than two decades. Although such a work of fiction is a...
Dreams and Prophecy

Dreams and Prophecy in Ancient Greece

Ancient Greeks writers tend to distinguish two categories of dreams, those that are insignificant, caused by hopes, fears, digestion, and other residues of the day, and those that are significant...
Prometheus Myth: The Creator of Man - The true story

Prometheus: The Creator of Man

Prometheus was a demigod, the son of the Titan Iapetus and Clymene or Asia (daughters of Oceanus). Siblings were Epimetheus ("afterthinker "), the Atlas and Menoetius. Married to Celaeno or Clymene...
Underground cities and networks around the World

Underground cities and networks around the World – Discoveries (Part 2)

Recently in my article I mentioned how extensive underground networks of tunnels have been found throughout Europe. Here we explore some of the other remarkable underground discoveries that have...
Underground cities and networks around the World

Underground cities and networks around the World – Myths and Reality (Part 1)

Underground structures even whole cities have always been part of most of the world’s myths and religions. A few have been discovered but most of them have not. Side by side with the stories about...
Zeus and Poseidon

The Mighty Gods Zeus & Poseidon

The Greek gods had much in common with Sumerian deities. Zeus was the Greek equivalent of Enlil (later Ammon), Babylonian God of Heaven and Earth. Poseidon was the Greek equivalent of Oannes , the...
Daedalus and Icarus

Daedalus and Icarus - Constructors of Flying machines?

Daedalus was a great and respected architect, inventor and sculptor, and descendant of the royal family of Cecrops , the founder and first king of Athens. Half man and half snake (or dragon), Cecrops...
Perseus - Greek Mythology

Perseus: Powerful Demigod wth Mighty Weapons

The story of Perseus is adventurous, as indeed befits a demigod. His grandfather was the king of Argos, Acrisius , who with his wife, Eurydice, had a daughter Danae . But Acrisius wanted a son. He...
Legendary Kraken

The Legendary Kraken

According to the Scandinavian mythology, the Kraken is a giant sea creature (said to be 1 mile long) that attacks ships and is generally described as an octopus or squid. According to some tales, the...
Minotauros

The Myth of the Minotaur

One of the most intriguing myths of ancient Greece is the myth of the Minotaur on the island of Crete . King Minos was one of the three sons born to Zeus and Europa. When their step-father, King...
King Minos

King Minos of Crete

The most important king of the Cretan civilization was King Minos, for whom the civilization was named. Minos ruled during the peak of the Minoan civilization, and the city of Knossos was the largest...

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Virtual recreation by Charles Chipiez. A panoramic view of the gardens and outside of the Palace of Darius I of Persia in Persepolis.
Once the stunning capital of the Persian Empire (also known as the Achaemenid Empire), Persepolis was lost to the world for almost nineteen hundred years, buried in the dirt of southwestern Iran until the 17th century. Founded in 518 BC by Darius I of the Persian Empire, Persepolis (called Parsa by the native Persians) lasted only a mere two hundred years despite the grandeur Darius and his followers abundantly heaped on its construction. Notwithstanding Persepolis’ tragic end, what remains of the Persian citadel is astounding.

Myths & Legends

The Smelliest Women of Ancient Greece: Jason and the Argonauts Get Fragrant
We all know Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love and beauty, made sure that she was worshipped by punishing those who ignored her altars. One brief appearance of this wrath in the tale of Jason and the Argonauts turned into a particularly fragrant episode.

Ancient Places

Inside one of the tunnels under Valetta, Malta.
Hordes of tourists visit the Mediterranean island of Malta each year to enjoy the above ground attractions the country has to offer such as breath-taking sandy beaches, historical buildings, and traditional cuisine. Yet, there is also a subterranean world hidden beneath the island’s surface. These are the rumored secret tunnels of Malta.

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At Ancient Origins, we believe that one of the most important fields of knowledge we can pursue as human beings is our beginnings. And while some people may seem content with the story as it stands, our view is that there exists countless mysteries, scientific anomalies and surprising artifacts that have yet to be discovered and explained.

The goal of Ancient Origins is to highlight recent archaeological discoveries, peer-reviewed academic research and evidence, as well as offering alternative viewpoints and explanations of science, archaeology, mythology, religion and history around the globe.

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By bringing together top experts and authors, this archaeology website explores lost civilizations, examines sacred writings, tours ancient places, investigates ancient discoveries and questions mysterious happenings. Our open community is dedicated to digging into the origins of our species on planet earth, and question wherever the discoveries might take us. We seek to retell the story of our beginnings. 

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View from the Castle Gate (Burgtor). (Public Domain)
Door surrounded by roots of Tetrameles nudiflora in the Khmer temple of Ta Phrom, Angkor temple complex, located today in Cambodia. (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Cable car in the Xihai (West Sea) Grand Canyon (CC BY-SA 4.0)