Ancient Inscription with magic and spells

The Ancient Art of Magic, Curses and Supernatural Spells

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As long as humanity has had beliefs in deities, the supernatural, and the power of magic, the use of magic, spells, and curses have featured widely across cultures. Very much entwined with human nature, such beliefs and practices have continued to the present day. Archaeological finds show evidence of a plethora of ancient curses and protective spells, such as the discovery of cursed tablets , evil eye talismans , and warding items .

The history of curses varies between cultures, locations, religions or beliefs, and times. However, the intention of the curse has consistently been to conjure a supernatural power to inflict misfortune or punishment on a target. A curse, sometimes called jinx, hex, or dark spell, can be verbalized, written, or sometimes cast through elaborate ritual. The aim is to see harm befall the recipient - bad luck may dog them, death may take them, or any number of dire (or annoying) fates may plague them. In antiquity a curse was a powerful phenomenon, often viewed as the summoned wrath of gods, or the presence of evil forces.

It was believed that those finding themselves cursed could seek help from magic practitioners, shamans, religious leaders, healers or witchdoctors, and have the curse reversed through counter rituals or prayer. A way to avoid being cursed in the first place was to possess certain items of protection or warding.

The purpose of spells and curses were, and remain today, aimed at punishing or changing behavior, warding off disaster, and controlling the actions of other people.

Pharaohs Curse

Ancient Egyptian curses are probably the most notorious. They gained infamy in 1922 when the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun was opened. The mysterious deaths of some of the archaeology team and prominent visitors to the tomb soon after it was opened, and the subsequent publicity, caused a firestorm of speculation as to the power of the curses. Journalists and authors of the day fanned the flames.

In reality, deadly curses in royal tombs in Egypt are rare, as the idea of invaders or raiders breeching the tomb and desecrating the contents was unthinkable and even dangerous to inscribe. Warnings or wards were more frequently used to preserve the ritual purity of a tomb, or for generalized protection. Wikipedia notes that some curses can be found in private tombs of the Old Kingdom.  One tomb from the 9 th to 10 th dynasty warns "any ruler who... shall do evil or wickedness to this coffin... may Hemen ([a local deity]) not accept any goods he offers, and may his heir not inherit".

The Royal Cobra (Uraeus) on the mask of Tutankhamun

The Royal Cobra (Uraeus) on the mask of Tutankhamun represented a protector goddess, and not a curse. ( Wikipedia)

Warnings and Wardings

Curses, or the threat of cursed objects, was a clever method used to protect valuables. During the Medieval period, book curses were widely used and effective at keeping thieves away from precious tomes and important scrolls. The Medieval Catholic Church possessed many of the books, and the penalty for defacing or stealing books was high. Curses written in the tomes warned would-be thieves of dire repercussions, such as excommunication or damnation.  This practice dated back to pre-Christian times, and was used in the earliest libraries. The books in a collection at the library at Ninevah in Mesopotamia were marked with various curses. In what reads as a threat against copyright infringement, one text has the warning, “Whosoever shall carry off this tablet, or shall inscribe his name on it, side by side with mine own, may Ashur and Belit overthrow him in wrath and anger, and may they destroy his name and posterity in the land.”

The idea of curses and jinxes is found in various holy books, as in the Christian Bible. The Generational Curse is one mentioned, appearing multiple times, notes GotQuestions, “(Exodus 20:5; 34:7; Numbers 14:18; Deuteronomy 5:9). God warns that He is “a jealous God, punishing the children for the sin of the fathers to the third and fourth generation of those who hate me.” The recommended way to break the generational curse is to repent and find salvation.

The infamous Devil’s Bible , a massive manuscript that legend says was written in a single night by a monk in a pact with the devil, is said to be cursed and brings misfortune to any who possess it.

Malevolent Hexes and Witchcraft

While history shows that pre-Christian beliefs included the power of both light blessings and curses, the concept of dark curses is now often associated with witchcraft and dark spirits.

Comments

There seems to be a focus on the negative side of magic everywhere you look. We need articles about the positive side. Magic takes so many forms and is also a misnomer. All "magic" comes from within, from the spirit, such as healing, the power of prayer, the ability to change, creating merkabas, and oh so much more.

u are on to something

lizleafloor's picture

Hi Antientarcana, thanks for the comment. I hear where you're coming from, and I agree. The thrust of this article was ancient curses, but I hope to examine the light/healing/blessing side of magical tradition in cultures as well in future articles.

Hi,

You said: "...but I hope to examine the light/healing/blessing side of magical tradition in cultures as well in future articles.

Please do.

I've been a student and practitioner of spirituality, metaphysics, religion, philosophy, etc., since 1958. I've been a practicing witch for over twenty years and a priest, for at least en of them. Magic has been a HUGE part of my practice. However, never have I uttered, read, or written any spell or curse that would harm another person. We're very aware of our Krma and the ripple effect of spells. There is a dictum throughout most of the Pagan population that states: "An Ye (or it) Harm None, Do What Ye Will". Most Pagans use the creative force of the Universe to heal, or otherwise help people.

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