Giovanni Pastore

Prof. Giovanni Pastore

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Professor Giovanni Pastore (1954, Rotondella - Basilicata, Italy), received his degree in mechanical engineering at Turin Polytechnic University in 1978. Even before graduating he was offered a contract at Fiat Mirafiori in Turin, where for the following five years he worked at the automotive design office, dealing with structural calculations.

He was a reserve officer with the Army Corps of Engineers at the plant of ex-combat vehicles STAVECO at Nola (Naples, Italy), appointed with the task of the revision and testing of tanks (Leopard and M113). Some years later he was recalled to duty, at the same plant, for technical updates and degree advancements.

He has lived and worked in Policoro (Basilicata, Italy) since 1982, where he works as a freelance engineer and Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering at several Italian universities.

He has published numerous scientific articles and books: in Italian, Gli infortuni domestici. Come prevenirli (ISBN 9788890471506), Antikythera e i regoli calcolatori (ISBN 9788890471513), Il Planetario di Archimede ritrovato (ISBN 9788890471520), Pitagora nel mondo contemporaneo. Influenze della filosofia scientifica pitagorica nel mondo moderno e contemporaneo (ISBN 9788890471537) and in english The Recovered Archimedes Planetarium (ISBN 9788890471544).

Website: http://www.giovannipastore.it/index_english.htm

The Recovered Archimedes Planetarium

Science, technology, history, literature and archaeology, certainty and conjecture on the most ancient and extraordinary astronomical calculating device. With two other scientific studies: on the Antikythera Planetarium and the Pitcher of Ripacandida.

Science, technology, history, literature and archaeology, certainty and conjecture on the most ancient and extraordinary astronomical calculating device. With two other scientific studies: on the Antikythera Planetarium and the Pitcher of Ripacandida.

The restoration of the gearwheel found in Olbia (Sardinia, Italy) in 2006 by the Superintendence for Archaeological Heritage, dated between the mid 2nd century and the end of the 3rd century BC, has revealed a very important surprise: the teeth have a special curving which make them extraordinarily similar to the mathematically perfect profile used in modern gears. Moreover the unusual composition of the alloy (brass) was completely unexpected. As it turns out, the gear is very scientifically advanced despite being constructed before all other known mechanisms to date. Considering the perfect correlation between the scientific evidence and historical, literary and archaeological studies, it does not seem rash to conclude that the fragment from Olbia was an integral part of the Archimedes Planetarium (Orrery). In this book, you will find all the supporting evidence and the scientific tests which have led me to attribute the fragment of the cogwheel found in Olbia to the Archimedes Planetarium.

There are also two recent scientific studies presented in this work. In the second part of the book, a study is presented on the kinematic model of the Greek Antikythera Planetarium also used in the gear of Olbia which predates Copernicus’ heliocentrism. The knowledge of epicyclic or planetary motion, necessary for the design of the epicyclic gearing in the Antikythera Planetarium as well as in the tooth profile of the Archimedes gear, lets us presume that some Hellenistic scientists were aware of how to calculate the planetary motion of celestial bodies. They could, therefore, have achieved the same results attained in the modern age, 2000 years later. The third part of the work presents the study of the 5th century BC Pitcher of Ripacandida in Basilicata (Italy) of Pythagorean derivation and the historical event of a great meteorite impact on the Earth is revealed, thus demonstrating that the extraordinarily modern physical laws graphically represented on the pitcher are in complete antithesis with the successive dogmatic physics of Aristotle.

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