Lucy Wyatt

Lucy Wyatt

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After studying International Relations and Italian at University, Lucy Wyatt went on to work for the National Economic Development Office, then in commercial design and marketing within Sir Terence Conran's empire and followed this by editing a business magazine for a firm of City of London stockbrokers. Lucy Wyatt comes from an illustrious family of mathematicians, architects and writers and herself has a life-long fascination for the ancient past and the political and economic realities of the 'bigger picture'. She lives with her family on an eco-farm in Suffolk, where she puts much of what she has learnt from her research into practice.  Approaching Chaos is her first book.

Lucy is co-organizing the Eternal Knowledge Festival at Greenwich University in July 2014. Speakers at EKF 2014 include: Robert Bauval, Paul Devereux and Adrian Gilbert, the full speaker line up is available on the event website .

Lucy Wyatt BookThere can be little doubt that our twenty-first century civilization is facing economic, ecological and spiritual meltdown. In this intriguing new book, Lucy Wyatt takes a highly original and relevant look at just what we can do to reverse this very real and potentially disastrous situation. 

The product of some ten years of comprehensive and passionate research, Approaching Chaos urges us to take a good look way back beyond those societies always admired as the first civilized examples, to re-think accepted accounts and concepts of history and go back over 5,000 years to focus on the Bronze Age civilizations. Nearly always considered to be both primitive and pagan, Lucy Wyatt reveals them to be in many ways extraordinarily sophisticated, well-rounded and highly successful infrastructures that combine the spiritual and the practical. She ardently believes that from them the ancient Greeks and Romans actually learnt and, even more pertinently, we can learn a tremendous amount that has been disregarded for far too long.

In taking a fresh look at, amongst other things, the origins of farming and urbanisation, the extraordinary way that the Egyptians used metaphysics, ultrasound and alchemy, the rise of Monotheistic religion and Christianity, Lucy Wyatt presents a brave and compelling over-view of ancient history. Approaching Chaos challenges long accepted thinking on the origins of civilization and uncovers many illuminating insights into how we could help ourselves today.

For further information visit http://www.approachingchaos.co.uk/

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