Liana Souvaltzi

Liana Souvaltzi

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Liana Souvaltzi graduated from National and Kapodistrian University of Athens Greece, Faculty of Philosophy, Department of Archaeology.

She worked with Missions on excavations in Greece from 1973-1986.

From 1986-1990, she held the post of Secretary General of the Friends Association of the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.

In 1989, Liana Souvaltzi started her own excavations at El Maraki, Siwa oasis in Egypt.

Liana Souvaltzi is a member of the following Associations:

1) The Association of Archaeologists, Historians and Philologists of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens Greece,

2) The Friends Association of the Archaeological Museum in Athens,

3) The Friends Association of the Archaeological Museum in Piraeus,

4) In the Institute of Hellenistic Studies,

5) In the Egypt Exploration Society in London,

6) Honorary Member of the Spanish Archaeological Society in Madrid.

Lectures

She has given many lectures in Greece, in Europe, in Africa invited by Universities, Institutes and Associations.

Conferences

Since 1987 to the present she has participated as a speaker in International Conferences, in European Conferences and Inter State Conferences in Greece.

Awards

Liana Souvaltzi has received awards for the Discovery of the Tomb of Alexander the Great and her scientific work which has been accorded great esteem by international professional organizations both in Greece and abroad.

Publications

Liana Souvaltzi has published a book entitled “The Tomb of Alexander the Great at Siwa Oasis”, on the excavations and the political background.

The Greek version of the book was published in 1999 and the book was translated in English and in Japanese in 2002.

Liana Souvaltzi and her husband, Manos Souvaltzis, Advocate and specialized in the Epigraphy, published a second book entitled “Alexander-Dionysus, A Common Vision” in the Greek Language in 2008 and in the English Language in 2009.

Liana Souvaltzi has published articles in the proceedings of the International Conferences as well as in many Greek and Foreign Journals.

 

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