Retaining Ancient Ways: Codex Runicus, How the Runic Script Survived in the Middle Ages

Retaining Ancient Ways: Codex Runicus, How the Runic Script Survived in the Middle Ages

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Runic script was developed in Scandinavia between the 2nd and 8th centuries AD. It was originally used for short inscriptions. After the Viking Age, this famous form of writing was altered to compete with the Latin script. Following the Christianization of Scandinavia, that foreign script came to be used increasingly for legal and ecclesiastical texts. The local runic script, however, remained popular for everyday use. The Scandinavian peoples weren’t going to disregard years of tradition just to appease foreign influence, and the Codex Runicus was one of the results of this resistance.

A Famous Runic Law Document

During the 13th century, laws in the Scandinavian kingdoms began to be codified in manuscripts. Most legal codes were written in the Latin alphabet and language, but in some cases they were created using runes in a Scandinavian language.

The most well-known example of this is the Codex Runicus, a 202-page legal text written in manuscript form. Since this document is rare it does not appear to be a natural transition from Viking Age uses of runes to Medieval manuscript culture. Instead, it may have been an attempt to resist acculturation from Medieval Western Europe using runes. There is evidence of other manuscripts created with runes, though they are uncommon. One example is a religious text about the Virgin Mary.

A page in the Codex Runicus.

A page in the Codex Runicus. ( Public Domain )

The Codex Runicus is divided into three parts, a section on Danish Scanian Law, a section on Scanian Ecclesiastical Law, and a list of Danish kings with a description of the Swedish-Danish border. The script is written using a later Medieval form of the runic writing which consisted of 27 letters to match all the phonemes represented by the Latin alphabet. It was based on the Younger Futhark system, which contained only 16 letters and was limited to the sound system of Scandinavian languages. The Younger Futhark system itself is based on the Elder Futhark, which originated around 150 AD and contained 24 characters.

A 1710 map of Skåneland, which consists of the provinces Scania, Halland and Blekinge.

A 1710 map of Skåneland, which consists of the provinces Scania, Halland and Blekinge. ( Public Domain )

Runes for Resistance

Compared to the Medieval runes, the runes used during what is called the Viking Age (roughly 750-1050 AD) and prior were quite limited in their use. They were commonly used for marking personal possessions and for making magical inscriptions. In contrast, Medieval runes were used in common business transactions by traders, farmers, and artisans. They were also used to decorate official buildings, such as churches.

Drawing of a church bell from Saleby, Västergötland, Sweden, with a runic inscription from 1228.

Drawing of a church bell from Saleby, Västergötland, Sweden, with a runic inscription from 1228. ( Public Domain )

Runes continued to be used in Scandinavian countries, especially Sweden, into the 19th century. According to scholars such as Sven BF Jansson, Latin letters were considered to be a foreign element by many Swedes - which meant people resisted their use for unofficial settings and personal communication. There were Swedish provinces, such as the Dalarna province, where runes were still in common use until at least the early 18th century. Runes were also in regular use in Iceland in the 15th century and possibly later.

Although Scandinavia is generally considered to be absorbed into the western European cultural block today, there always seems to have been a tension between Scandinavian cultural identity and the rest of Europe. Another example of this is seen in Scandinavia’s slow adoption of Christianity. Paganism persisted in parts of Scandinavia until at least the 12th century, and perhaps even later. This may have been a stand against the influence of western European culture as well as resistance to a new, unfamiliar religion. It is possible that the use of runes in the Codex Runicus could be another manifestation of this opposition in the legal realm.

Dalecarlian rune inscription from 1635 in Orsblecksloftet, Zorns gammelgård, Mora, Mora Municipality, Dalarna, Sweden.

Dalecarlian rune inscription from 1635 in Orsblecksloftet, Zorns gammelgård, Mora, Mora Municipality, Dalarna, Sweden. ( Public Domain )

Changing Legal Codes

The ancient Norse legal codes were oral. Wise men known as lawspeakers would memorize and recite the laws before assemblies (known as things ( þing) - an institution which functioned in most Scandinavian societies as a parliament, court, or both.) Later, during the Middle Ages, as the kingdoms of Denmark, Sweden, and Iceland formed, the position of lawspeaker was made into an official office and in most cases, lawspeakers became authorized members of the thing, or royal officials.

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