Armenia

Ruins of the Ani Cathedral by Gevorg Bashinjaghian (1901)

The Sacred Ghost Town of Ani, City of 1001 Churches: Deserted By Man, Destroyed By Nature

First mentioned in the 5th century by Armenian chroniclers, the “Ghost City” of Ani was described as a strong fortress on a hilltop that was a possession of the Armenian Kamsarakan dynasty. From this...
5500-year-old shoe in hand of researcher

The Everlasting Shoe: What Does This 5,500-Year-old Shoe Found in a Cave Tell Us About Ancient Armenians?

As any archaeologist knows, very few things other than stone last for a long time. In a moist, warm climate, most organic material such as hemp, cloth, wood, and leather will decay, leaving nothing...
Armenian Stonehenge: Incredible History of the 7,500-Year-old Observatory of Zorats Karer

Armenian Stonehenge: Incredible History of the 7,500-Year-old Observatory of Zorats Karer

Armenia is a country full of archeological surprises. It is a country where mysterious stories appear at every corner, and most of them still wait to be solved. However, one of the greatest stories...
Mithra slaying the bull. Royal Ontario Museum

The Cult of Mithra: Sacred Temples, and Vedic Legends, and Ancient Armenian Understanding

Mithra was the god of light, purity, goodness, truth and occupied an important place in the faith of the ancient Aryans. The Spread of Mithra There are various opinions on the spread of the Mithra (...
Celestial Maps of Gegham Mountain: The Unique Rock Art of Armenia

Celestial Maps of Gegham Mountain: The Unique Rock Art of Armenia

In the volcanic Gegham and Vardenis Mountains of Armenia, architect Suren Petrosyan discovered unique and mysterious astrological rock art paintings. Experts have different opinions on the creation...
Serpent Stones: The Vishap Steles of Armenia as a Symbol of Rock Art and Rich Heritage

Serpent Stones: The Vishap Steles of Armenia as a Symbol of Rock Art and Rich Heritage

A vishap stele (known also as vishapakar and vishap stone) is a type of stone monument that can be found in Armenia. These steles may be identified by the carvings on them, usually of fishes or...
Vahagn: The Armenian Dragon Slayer God and Bringer of Fire

Vahagn: The Armenian Dragon Slayer God and Bringer of Fire

Vahagn is a deity that was worshipped in Armenia during the period prior to the coming of Christianity. Vahagn was revered as a fire god. The name Vahagn is derived from a combination of two Sanskrit...
Metal belt from Metsamor site, Armenia. Second century BC.

The Legacy of Armenia: Trade, Metallurgy, and Forging of Precious Metals of the Ancient World

Since ancient times, demand for metals has been a big part of commercial exchange between countries separated by great distance. The Armenian Highland is situated between the Anatolian and Iranian...
Urartian Susi Temple in the Erebuni Fortress.

The Great Erebuni of the Uratian Kingdom: Fortress of Blood

Erebuni Fortress, known also as Arin Berd (meaning ‘Fortress of Blood’) is a fortified settlement located in the southeastern outskirts of the modern city of Yerevan, Armenia. This fortress was...
Matera, Basilicata, Italy. The Sasso Barisano looking east.

Echoes from the Past: The Cave Churches of Matera

Matera, is an Italian city located in a southern region known as the Basilicata; between the heel and the tip of the boot of Italy. UNESCO reports that the area has been inhabited since the Neolithic...
Human remains at the necropolis, (2013) Karmir Blur, Armenia (vchechne.ru)

It is Possibly the Largest Iron Age Necropolis in the Near East But Archaeologists only Have Six Months to Excavate

Rescue archaeology is a common occurrence for those in the field. This time, a team of archaeologists are fighting against time to complete excavations at a 2,600 year old Urartian necropolis in...
Geghard Monastery

Geghard Monastery: Ancient Guardian of the Lance that Stabbed Jesus?

According to the Gospel of John, Jesus was stabbed in his side by a lance whilst hanging from the cross. As a result, this weapon is believed to possess supernatural powers, and became an important...
Tool-making in the Stone Age

Paleolithic weapons factory was a rich source of obsidian tools from 1.4 million years ago

Scientists call Mount Arteni in Armenia, an extinct volcano that has rich deposits of obsidian, a Stone Age weapons factory. They say from about 1.4 million years, Homo erectus people and later Homo...
Tigranes the Great, King of Armenia

The Rise and Fall of Tigranes the Great, King of Armenia

Under King Tigranes II the Great, from 95 to 55 B.C. Armenia thrived, and became the strongest state in the Roman east for a time. In the aftermath of the defeat of Antiochus the Great by the Romans...
In a shrine in a hilltop fortress in ancient Armenia, seers may have tried for foresee of even change the future.

Despite possible efforts to alter the future, a greedy ancient polity went down in flames

It is unknown what words or rites seers in Armenia chanted 3,300 years ago to tell the rich ruling class what the future held, but the chambers they attempted to do their magic in contained a...

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Myths & Legends

A vase-scene from about 410 BC. Nimrod/Herakles, wearing his fearsome lion skin headdress, spins Noah/Nereus around and looks him straight in the eye. Noah gets the message and grimaces, grasping his scepter, a symbol of his rule - soon to be displaced in the post-Flood world by Nimrod/Herakles, whose visage reveals a stern smirk.
The Book of Genesis describes human history. Ancient Greek religious art depicts human history. While their viewpoints are opposite, the recounted events and characters match each other in convincing detail. This brief article focuses on how Greek religious art portrayed Noah, and how it portrayed Nimrod in his successful rebellion against Noah’s authority.

Human Origins

Sumerian creation myth
Sumer , or the ‘land of civilized kings’, flourished in Mesopotamia, now modern-day Iraq, around 4500 BC. Sumerians created an advanced civilization with its own system of elaborate language and...

Ancient Technology

All images courtesy of Dr Rita Louise
The vajra is the most important ritual implement of Vajrayana Buddhism. In Sanskrit, the word vajra is defined as something hard or mighty, as in a diamond. It symbolizes an impenetrable, immovable and indestructible state of knowledge and enlightenment.

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View from the Castle Gate (Burgtor). (Public Domain)
Door surrounded by roots of Tetrameles nudiflora in the Khmer temple of Ta Phrom, Angkor temple complex, located today in Cambodia. (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Cable car in the Xihai (West Sea) Grand Canyon (CC BY-SA 4.0)