The Palace at Sayil, a Maya city on the Gulf of Mexico side of the Yucatan Peninsula. Heavily damaged by ancient floods, complete reconstruction is impossible because of scattered stoneworks.

The Maya Controversy: Startling New Evidence for an Antediluvian People who Influenced the World

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An example of the destructive force of water is apparent at Sayil, a beautiful city on the Gulf Coast of the Peninsula, about 115 kilometers (72 miles) south of Merida, the capital city of Yucatan. The main acropolis is highlighted by a large, ornately designed palace noted for its multi-tiered and columned Puuc style architecture. Standing at the entranceway, to the onlooker the palace appears to have undergone a horrific event—most likely, the powerful action of tsunami waves pounding the building with terrific force. Large volumes of building stones have been pushed down and lay scattered in piles across the top and sides of the architecture, leaving the building heavily damaged. The severity of this erosion is such that excavation teams have been unable to reconstruct large sections of the palace, and as noted, at most of the other neighboring cities, stones are left where there fell.

Sayil, Yucatan Mexico. Maya Elder Hunbatz Men points to a symbol for great age on the door frame of a building partially sunk in the ground. This area was deluged by flooding and perhaps tsunamis. (Photo: Cliff Dunning)

Sayil, Yucatan Mexico. Maya Elder Hunbatz Men points to a symbol for great age on the door frame of a building partially sunk in the ground. This area was deluged by flooding and perhaps tsunamis. (Photo: Cliff Dunning)

Sayil is a good example of how a river of receding water has left its mark. Early photos show the path of a river created by receding water as it flowed across the top of the palace in what can only be imagined as significant water movement. A short distance away, a number of buildings are partially buried in the ground (a curious state that archeologists seem to have missed.) Also striking are the images taken by early explorers (most notably Augustus Le Plongeon in the 1890s) of buildings with large quantities of stones and debris piled high around the main acropolis at Uxmal and Chichen Itza. As the water receded, heavy sediment and stones made their way into the interior and exterior of buildings where they laid to rest.  

The remains of building complexes underwater on the Yucatan Peninsula. The corrosive action of salt water on limestone may have reduced these structures down to their foundations. (Image: Google Earth Pro. Google Earth, 2017)

The remains of building complexes underwater on the Yucatan Peninsula. The corrosive action of salt water on limestone may have reduced these structures down to their foundations. (Image: Google Earth Pro. Google Earth, 2017)

Baylands off the coast of Campeche, Yucatan Mexico, show the remains of a Sacbe and partially hidden Maya ruin. (Photo courtesy of Angela Micol, Satellite Archeaology).

Baylands off the coast of Campeche, Yucatan Mexico, show the remains of a Sacbe and partially hidden Maya ruin. (Photo courtesy of Angela Micol, Satellite Archeaology).

How ancient these Maya cities are is anyone’s guess— but new evidence now shows these people to be fantastically old. With the advent of powerful satellite imaging technology, we can follow the path of white roads known as Sacbes which run for miles in all directions.

Sacbes: the White Roads, and Clues to the Antiquity of the Maya

We now have good evidence for mega flooding up and down the West Coast of the United States following the Younger Dryas asteroid catastrophe approximately 10 – 12,000 years ago. Geologist Harken Bretz first described these massive mega-floods in the 1920s, which carved huge valleys and waterways in Washington State and northern Oregon, and which was later validated by geologists around the country. Catastrophist Randall Carlson believes there were similar mega-floods around the U.S. as a result of this impact, and the following increase in atmospheric temperatures. Climatologists have confirmed that Earth’s temperatures rose sharply following the impact, which melted large portions of the polar ice caps, resulting in a sharp rise in sea levels and floods.

These mega-floods destroyed everything in their path, including civilizations throughout the Americas. The Zuni, Lakota, and Maya describe this period in their history and the terrible conditions their ancestors endured following the deluge. Thankfully, by studying the path of sacbes and with the help of modern satellite technology we can discover what can be only described as near-terminating flood events which befell the inhabitants of the Americas.

First described by archaeologists in the 1920s as an engineering marvel, the sacbe is the equivalent to our modern highway, connecting cities for hundreds of miles, and ranging in size from 10 feet to up to 25 feet wide (three to 7.6 meters wide). Designed to withstand most elements, these white roads carried people and facilitated commerce, and have lasted for centuries with little or no maintenance. Composed of a rock substructure, mortar, retaining walls, and concrete as a paving surface, they crisscross most of the major Maya cities and are visible from planes and satellites.

Comments

This appears to be a very interesting site which touches on many of my interest. I look forward to exploring it in greater detail in the future.

From Egyptian to Indus Valley to Mayan civilisations, we need to study their materials to understand the depth of their science.

AintGottaClue's picture

I believe more attention should also be paid to their "legends," as nearly all legends have a core of factual truth in them. The "legend" didn't just spring from their imagination completely....something had to touch it off in order for them to even think about it in the first place.

History is nowhere near as well known as we think it is.

Fascinating reading. Read the book "1491"

AintGottaClue's picture

Given the anomalous finds in archaeology, a picture emerges of multiple origins and demises of civilization over a period of better than a million years. The most "recent" emergence of modern type civilization appears to date from perhaps 12-14,000 BC. It might be suggested that a few "survivors" from these civilizations carried on as best they could until building up in numbers sufficient to form large "villages, or even cities," and the beginning of larger scale civilization once again. With regard to the most recent emergence of civilization, you also have the problem of most being "full blown civilizations," with advanced knowledge (such as the Sumerian civilization, for one example), and with no explanation from conventional historians as to how that advanced knowledge was acquired. How does one go from the "primitive," to "full blown, modernistic, civilization," with no intermediate steps visible in the archaeological record? Using the Sumerians for an example, they had it all...from A - Z. Agriculture, animal husbandry, construction engineering, professional castes from bakers to jewelers, religion, sophisticated government and laws, science and mathematics, schools, a complete "modernistic," full blown civilization, that even the conventional historians are forced to admit they have no clue WHERE they came from, or HOW they acquired all this knowledge. There are, of course, other examples, as well, notably in South America, and Northwestern India. The "alien intervention" theories seem to form the only realistic explanation as to how all this knowledge was acquired literally "overnight." With the revival of the Rh Negative blood factor controversy, it also appears there is a good possibility that small groups of people were subject to deliberate genetic manipulation by those same "aliens." Whether any of the conventional historians like it or not, the "alien intervention" theory is the ONLY theory set forth (at least so far) that offers a rational, logical argument for this sudden appearance of full blown civilization in various parts of the world in the same time frame.

History is nowhere near as well known as we think it is.

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